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FROM THIS EPISODE

LA has long been celebrated as a city of “mobility.” But now the region has become so gridlocked people are looking for new ways to keep on moving. Harald Belker talks about the automated cars he designed for the movie Minority Report and the consumer robotics game Anki – and what they mean for real cars. Marlyn Musicant talks about Union Station, celebrating its 75th birthday with a revival of rail transit. And Avishay Artsy talks about a centennial celebration of Llano Del Rio a socialist living experiment in Palmdale and the architect who tried to use design and planning to free women of housework and childcare.
 
Banner Image: David Mayerhofer via Flickr

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Caroline Chamberlain

Harald Belker 11 MIN, 40 SEC
Recent studies find that LA has among the worst traffic in the nation, with LA drivers wasting around 60 hours annually behind the wheel; the LA 2020 commission found that traffic would not even be relieved by all the new public transit currently under construction; the report found drivers would shave off a mere three minutes from their drives. So should we throw up our hands in frustration and accept being in a permanent state of staying still? Or are there ways to keep moving, with the style and panache we enjoyed for so long, along with a commitment to safety and cleaner energy? 
 
Harald Belker studied car design at Art Center College of Design, then worked for Porsche and Mercedes before going on to design cars for Batman and Robin and Minority Report. He is currently head of design at Anki, an interactive video game involving robotic cars. He talks about whether we should be optimistic about the future of mobility in L.A.

Guests:
Harald Belker, Harald Belker Design

Llano del Rio 8 MIN, 48 SEC
Llano Del Rio, a socialist utopian experiment out in the desert, near Palmdale, featured some very progressive planning and home design ideas. This Saturday a group of artists will commemorate the centennial of Llano Del Rio, and in particular the little-known architect who dreamed up some very progressive planning and home design ideas for the community. KCRW's Avishay Artsy has delved into the fascinating story.

Guests:
Avishay Artsy, KCRW Producer (@heyavishay)

Union Station 9 MIN, 28 SEC

75 years ago LA was simply bursting with trains, so much so that it was decided the region needed a Union station to consolidate tracks under one roof. This Saturday Union Station celebrates its 75th anniversary with a big public party. And an exhibit opens at Los Angeles Central Library together with a book Los Angeles: Union Station. Marlyn Musicant curated the exhibit and edited the book. It turns out the process of getting the now beloved station built was fraught with hostilities, delays and downright racism.

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