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Photo: Close-up view of a Dodger player's hat, glove and ball left on the field, January 11, 1989. (James Ruebsamen, Herald-Examiner Collection / Los Angeles Public Library)

Dodger Stadium and the emergence of a modern Los Angeles 15 MIN, 39 SEC


Photograph caption dated August 26, 1960 reads, "With apparently all obstacles now out of the way, actual construction of the Los Angeles Dodgers' baseball stadium can get under way. Happily examining a scale model of the 56,000-seat park to be located in Chavez Ravine are (L-R) Dodger officials Dick Walsh, President Walter O'Malley and Buzzy [sic] Bavasi. Construction contract is signed."
Herald-Examiner Collection/Los Angeles Public Library

Dodger Stadium is now an icon of midcentury Los Angeles. But its birth was a painful one, and the battles over its construction tore Angelenos apart even as it now brings communities together.

As Los Angeles celebrates the Boys in Blue getting back into the World Series for the first time in almost 30 years, we recall the controversial early days of this beloved stadium, and why "the city downtown establishment wanted Dodger Stadium to be the first piece in the building of a modern world class downtown Los Angeles," as historian Jerald Podair says. We also discuss the irony that Latinos are among the team's biggest fans, even though the stadium occupied the Chavez Ravine site from which many Mexican-American families were uprooted.

Guests:
Jerald Podair, Lawrence University

More:
Christopher Hawthorne reviews 'City of Dreams'
How the Dodger baseball stadium shaped LA – and revealed its divisions
History News Network review of 'City of Dreams'
Can the center hold? Dodger Stadium and downtown Los Angeles

City of Dreams

Jerald Podair

A redesigned Highland Park Masonic Temple serves up food and music 12 MIN, 48 SEC


Superba Food + Bread in Venice, designed by Design, Bitches

Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph run a firm that is behind the buzz-worthy restaurant designs for Superba, The Oinkster, Counterculture, Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwiches, Burger Lords, Button Mash, as well as graphics and products and other kinds of spaces.

They studied at the experimental Southern California Institute of Architecture, or SCI-Arc, and met while working for architect Barbara Bestor. Seven years ago they founded a firm with what they call a "badass" approach to design. This month their peers at the AIA/LA will honor them with an "emerging practice" award.


Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph at Checker Hall, a new restaurant
they are designing in the former Highland Park Masonic Temple.

Their inventive, colorful spaces are intended to make people feel welcome and comfortable and to this end they gave themselves a firm that gets people feel comfortable with architecture even as it makes some people baulk at saying the second word: Design, Bitches.

They're finishing up a redesign of the historic 1920s Italian Renaissance Revival-style Highland Park Masonic Temple, which will reopen on November 3 as the Lodge Room, a music and events venue, with an attached restaurant called Checker Hall.

We talk to them about their latest project, their desire to go even more public, and why the comma is so important to their name.

Guests:
Catherine Johnson, Design, Bitches
Rebecca Rudolph, Design, Bitches

More:
Design, Bitches' colorful aesthetic is all over the map
Design, Bitches: Meet the architects shaping LA's sprawling food scene
Design, Bitches shakes up LA architecture

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