ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

As part of our series "Modern Trades," DnA visited the Electrical Training Institute, in the city of Commerce. It's where 1,500 apprentices are trained every year to become the electricians for the sustainable age. But why didn't they hear about this track in high school?

Jacob Zuma, the president of South Africa, narrowly escaped an impeachment vote last week. But that hasn't stopped people criticizing the flamboyant home that stands as a symbol of his excesses.

Despina Stratigakos looks at the role of glossy magazines in shaping the image of a murderous dictator. She explains how Adolf Hitler flaunted his home interiors to win over the global public during his rise to power.

Photo: Hollie Enriquez, student at the Electrical Training Institute (Frances Anderton)

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Avishay Artsy

Electrical Training Institute 11 MIN, 15 SEC

As part of our series "Modern Trades," DnA visited the Electrical Training Institute, in the city of Commerce. There 1,500 apprentices are trained every year to become electricians, and are combining new technology with traditional skills. The building itself is being retrofitted to become "net zero plus," providing a unique learning -- and earning -- experience for students. But it's a track they are not learning about in high school.

We also spoke with ETI students Errol Cutley, Hollie Enriquez, Daniel Huizar and Andy Hoeks.

Guests:
Kelly Candaele, writer and filmmaker
Brett Moss, Electrical Training Institute

More:
Electrical unions launch net-zero energy training center

Nkandla-gate 6 MIN, 45 SEC

South Africa is dealing with a controversy surrounding property and corruption. Jacob Zuma, the president of South Africa, narrowly escaped an impeachment vote last week after a politically damaging ruling by the country's highest court. The main cause of anger: his costly renovation of his ancestral home, on the taxpayers dime.

Guests:
Gideon Brower, Independent Producer (@GideonLA)
Marianne Thamm, Daily Maverick (@mariannethamm)

More:
Watch: Trevor Noah Slams Jacob Zuma over Nkandla Scandal
BBC News: What next for South Africa's Zuma after Nkandla ruling?

Hitler at Home 10 MIN, 36 SEC

Adolf Hitler started a World War and caused the deaths of millions. But during his rise to power in the 1930's, global news outlets seemed enthralled with the charismatic leader's home interiors. It turns out Nazi propagandists used interior design and aesthetic taste to sell Hitler to the world.

Guests:
Despina Stratigakos, University at Buffalo

More:
The Telegraph reviews "Hitler at Home," calls it 'splendidly unexpected'
An excerpt from "Hitler at Home"

Hitler at Home

Despina Stratigakos

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED