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FROM THIS EPISODE

Cranberries require a flood of water during harvest.  This week, third-generation cranberry grower Dawn Allen Gates tells us just what happens in a cranberry bog.  Farming is hard work, but it can also be therapeutic.  Michael O'Gorman explains how getting veterans out in the field can help deal with the damages of war.  Food writer Jonathan Gold takes us to a hip new street in Palms for some Indonesian food.  How about a chipa with your yerba mate?  Good Food listener Natalia Goldberg tells us what tea time in Paraguay is like.  Can pie be gender specific?  Barbara Swell shares stories about her pie competition in rural Appalachia where they had a special category for men's pies.  Still looking for WMD?  You just might find them in your fridge.  Arun Gupta explains how bacon is a weapon of mass destruction.  Laura Avery finds fresh macadamia nuts at the Santa Monica Farmers Market.

 

Well-Preserved

Eugenia Bone

Producers:
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Candace Moyer
Connie Alvarez
Holly Tarson
Harriet Ells
Gillian Ferguson

Guest Interview Farmer Veteran Coalition 7 MIN, 44 SEC

Farmer Veteran Coalition

Michael O'Gorman is the CEO of the Farmer Veteran Coalition, an organization that seeks to place veterans in farm-related jobs.  Their goal is to find "employment, training and places to heal" on U.S. farms.  Their mainly serve veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan but they assist all veterans.

Music Break: Latin Slide by La Clave

Guest Interview Indo Cafe 8 MIN, 2 SEC

Jonathan Gold is the Pulitzer Prize-winning restaurant critic for the LA Weekly.  This week he reviews Indo Cafe in the Palms neighborhood of Los Angeles.  At this Indonesian restaurant, Jonathan likes gado-gado and the fried chicken. 

Indo Cafe
10430 National Blvd., Los Angeles
(310) 815-1290

See all of Jonathan's recommendations on the Good Food Restaurant Map.

 

View Good Food Restaurant Map in a larger map

 


Music Break: Bastinado by Zook

Guest Interview Bacon As WMD 5 MIN, 42 SEC

Bacon

Arun Gupta is a founding editor of The Indypendent newspaper.  He recently wrote a piece for that publication and for Alternet.org called Gonzo Gastronomy: How the Food Industry Has Made Bacon a Weapon of Mass Destruction.

Guest Interview Tea Time in Paraguay 8 MIN, 10 SEC

Natalia Goldberg lives and works in Asunscion, Paraguay.  She is currently writing an online guide to traveling in this landlocked South American country.

Like neighboring Argentina and Uruguay, Paraguayans drink yerba mate, a kind of tea.  In Paraguay they drink a sweet mate (Mate Dulce).

Chipa is a kind of bread that is hard on the outside, but chewy and full of cheese on the inside.  It's sold on the street by chiperas and is sometimes prepared over an open fire.

Mandioca is a root vegetable that is very important to the Paraguayan diet.  Its very starchy and is made boiled or fried.

Chipera

Chipera

Mandioca

Mandioca

Mate Dulce

Mate Dulce

Yerba Mate

Yerba Mate


Music Break: Lowdown Popcorn by James Brown

Guest Interview Pie Perfection 5 MIN, 30 SEC

Lost Art of Pie MakingBarbara Swell is the author of The Lost Art of Pie Making Made Easy.  In her book she has step-by-step instructions on how to hold a pie contest.

KCRW is hosting the First Annual Good Food Pie Contest on November 14, 2009 from 2-4 pm at Westfield Topanga. 

Guest Interview Pie Fro-Down 8 MIN, 31 SEC

Pecan Pie Fro-Down

Greg Ng writes the blog Freezer Burns, where he reviews frozen food products.  Greg reviewed a few different frozen pies. 

In one of his "Fro Downs" he pitted Edwards Georgia Pecan Pie and Sara Lee's Southern Pecan Pie.  For Halloween he reviewed Marie Callender's Pumpkin Pie.  But his ultimate "Fro Down" was with apple pie.  He reviewed Marie Callender's Dutch Apple Pie, Sara Lee Dutch Apple Pie and Mrs. Smith's Dutch Apple Crumb Pie.

 

 

 
Guest Interview Market Report 8 MIN, 3 SEC

Amelia Saltsman shows us how to make an easy one pot meal -- chicken in a pot.  Amelia is the author of The Santa Monica Farmers Market Cookbook.

Amelia Saltsman’s Chicken in a Pot

Serves 4 to 6

1 oz dried porcini mushrooms, optional
1 large onion, chopped
3 carrots, finely chopped
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 Tablespoons finely chopped fresh herbs, such as rosemary or parsley
2 to 3 bay leaves
1 3 1/2-lb chicken, patted dry
3 or 4 sundried tomatoes, snipped in small pieces, or 2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 cup wine (red or white)
1 to 2 cups chicken stock or water
Kosher or sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Soak mushrooms in 1 cup boiling water until softened, about 15 minutes. Drain and reserve liquid. Cut mushrooms into bite-size pieces. Strain liquid through fine-mesh sieve lined with paper towel or coffee filter.

Meanwhile, in a large, wide pot over medium-low heat, sauté the onions and carrots in the olive oil with a little salt until softened and onion translucent but not browned, about 7 minutes. Stir in garlic, herbs, and bay leaves. Season chicken inside and out with salt. Push vegetables to the sides of the pot and place chicken in middle of pot, breast side up. Turn heat to medium and cook until vegetables are tender and chicken is starting to sizzle and get fragrant, 10 to 12 minutes.

Add wine to vegetables and stir. Cook until wine has reduced by half. Add mushrooms, tomatoes, reserved mushroom liquid, if using or 1 cup stock, and a few grindings of pepper. The liquid in the pot will be about 1 inch deep. Turn heat to low, cover pot, and cook the chicken at a very gentle simmer until it is very, very tender, about 1 to 1 1/4 hours. As the chicken cooks, pan juices will increase. Add additional stock or water as needed so that juices are at a depth of at least 2 inches. Baste chicken occasionally with pan juices. Adjust seasonings and discard bay leaves. Cut or pull chicken into serving size portions and serve with mashed potatoes, polenta, or 1/2 pound egg pasta, such as pappardelle or garganelli.

© 2009, Amelia Saltsman.

Macadamia Nuts


Jim Russell brings in fresh, raw Macadamia nuts from Fallbrook. These nuts are hard to crack but when you do they are sweet and crispy and not at all like the greasy, canned nuts you find in stores.

Music Break: Last Of The Red Hot Llamas by Baja Marimba Band

Guest Interview Cranberry Harvest 6 MIN, 48 SEC

Cranberry Boxes

Dawn Gates Allen is a third generation cranberry farmer in Cape Cod, MA.  Southeastern Massachusetts has over 14,000 acres of cranberry bogs.  The fruit is harvested in two ways: dry and wet harvest.  Only ten percent of cranberries are dry harvested.  The wet method is better for cranberry products like juice, dried cranberries and sauce.  Fresh berries are dry harvested.

Cranberry Harvest

In the wet harvest method, the field is flooded.  Every acre needs about 10 feet of water.  Flooding the cranberry plants is a way of protecting the bogs from winter cold and wind.  It's also done to prevent pests. 

Music Break: Last Tango In Turrell by Impala

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