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FROM THIS EPISODE

Playwright Amy Sedaris surprises us with her wacky, delightfully loose look at entertaining. Barbara Fairchild celebrates nearly 50 years of Bon Appétit. Eddie Lin eats Snakes on a Plate, Jonathan Gold eats up Thai Town and Marcus Samuellson discovers the flavors of Africa. Michelle Myers has spooky new treats from Boule and Mike Steinberger says not to be turned off by box wine.

One Good Dish

David Tanis

Producers:
Marina McLeod
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Thea Chaloner
Candace Moyer

Guest Interview Market Report - Pumpkins 6 MIN


Laura Avery speaks to Barbara Spencer of Windrose Farm about her wonderful assortment of fall pumpkins. She has white, blue, green, orange, and yellow pumpkins. She also sells huge pumpkins that look like the inspiration for Cinderella’s coach.

Laura also finds Alex Weiser’s terrific heap of Bloomsdale spinach, a heavily savoyed curly variety that Alex says has no bitter aftertaste, is very flavorful, and is organic and safe.

Guest Interview Jonathan Gold - Thai in the Valley 4 MIN

photo by Anne Fishbein

Jonathan Gold of LA Weekly visits a Thai restaurant in the valley.

Sri Siam, 12843 Vanowen St., North Hollywood; (818) 982-6262. 


Open daily 11 a.m.–10 p.m. No alcohol. Takeout and delivery. Lot parking. MC, V. $5.95 lunch specials. Dinner for two, food only, $14–$28.

Recommended dishes: o-lou; crispy rice salad; green-chile dip; steam curry cup; khao soi.

Music Break: Catwalk - Peter Moore

Guest Interview Snakes On a Plate 6 MIN

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Fearless diner Eddie Lin of Deep End Dining is eating snakes on a plate. (And living to tell about it.) For photos and a glimpse at his spectacular writing go to his site.



Music Break: Dinner with Friends - Count Basie & His Orchestra

Guest Interview Bon Apetit turns 50 7 MIN
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Barbara Fairchild, editor of Bon Appétit  talks about the magazine’s 50th birthday and depicts how food and recipes in the new Bon Appétit Cookbook can define an era.

Guest Interview World's Largest Pumpkin 3 MIN


How big is too big? Ask Ron Wallace, he's the world’s largest pumpkin grower for 2006. Click here for more photos. Congratulations Ron on your 1502 pound pumpkin weighed at the Frerichs Farm GPC weigh-off in Warren, RI on October 7, 2006.



Music Break: Drum Thythm A -  Koop

Guest Interview Wine in a Box 6 MIN

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Mike Steinberger, Wine Columnist at Slate.com, says that box wine is becoming surprisingly popular and should be looked at with fresh eyes. This is not your cheap uncles’ box wine from twenty years ago.

Box wines recommended by Mike Steinberger in his article on Slate, A Loaf of Bread, a Box of Wine? Good wine in strange containers.

 
Dtour 2004 Mâcon-Villages (France), $37 (3-liter tube)


Very assertive aromas, with a big whiff of honeysuckle, and some pineapple and verbena thrown in. Crisp and clean in the mouth, with more honeysuckle and a pronounced grapefruit note. Gently spicy across the palate. Nice. 

Dtour 2004 Côtes-du-Rhône (France), $37 (3-liter tube)

A spicy, inviting nose, redolent of cherries and with a subtle note of Provençal herbs. Warm, ripe, cherry fruit in the mouth with a not-unpleasant medicinal edge. Depth and persistence here, as well. An apples-and-oranges comparison, but I like this slightly better than the Mâcon. 

Three Thieves 2005 Chardonnay (California), $10.99 (1-liter jug)

A nice tropical nose of figs, melon, and lemon. Unoaked, which is pleasant. A little too sweet for my taste, but clean flavors, good concentration, and a nice lemony finish. As California chardonnays go, I've had a lot worse for a lot more.

Three Thieves 2003 Zinfandel (California), $10.99 (1-liter jug)

Spicy, brambly red berry aromas—the sort sometimes referred to as "zinberry"—along with a distinct medicinal note. A warm, fairly rich wine, with good structure and a decent finish. The classic American barbecue wine in a barbecue-friendly format.

Banrock Station 2005 Chardonnay (Australia), $18 (3-liter box)

Full-bodied, somewhat creamy wine, with peach, lemon, and marzipan flavors and a lick of honey. Some heft to the wine, but not at all heavy; best of all, lacks the sweetness that mars so many chardonnays, particularly at this price point. Surprisingly pleasant. 

Black Box 2004 Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon (California), $18 (3-liter box)

Hello, roadkill—a blast of animal fur greets the nose, and then quickly, mercifully gives way to red berries, smoke, and clay. A cabernet light in color and light on the palate—more East Coast in style than California. That said, not bad—sprightly red fruit with a nice dash of spice and good structure.

Music Break: Di-que-ding-ding - Michel Legrand

Guest Interview Halloween Candy 6 MIN
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Pastry Chef Michelle Myers of Boule scares up some Halloween confections for Good Food. Her homemade candy corn and marshmallow ghosts are all treat and no trick.

Boule, 420 N. La Cienega Boulevard, Los Angleles, CA 90048, 310-289-9977

Hours:
Monday through Saturday; 10:00 am - 7:00 pm, Sunday; 10:00 am - 5:00pm, 

Caramel Apples
yield:  8-10 apples depending on the size.

Sugar     1 cup
Butter     1/2 cup
Cream    2/3 cup
Corn syrup 1/4 cup
Molasses   2 T
Vanilla extract 1/4 tsp
Salt  1 pinch

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan.
Bring to a boil. Continue cooking until the mixture reaches 236F.
Remove from heat and cool to 180 F or cooler.

Candy Corn

Sugar 1 cup 
Corn syrup 2/3 cup
Butter 1/3 cup   
Vanilla extract 1 tsp
Confectioners sugar 2 1/2 cups
Sea salt 1/4 tsp
Non fat milk powder 1/3 cup
Food coloring

Combine the first 4 ingredients in a saucepan.  Bring to boil for 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

Sift the confectioners sugar, salt and milk powder. Add to the pot and stir until it is combined

Once it cools, divide the dough into 3 pieces. Add desired food coloring to the doughs (yellow, orange).  One of the doughs should be white. Once this is done, roll each piece out into a rope. When you have 3 ropes, push them together so it forms 1 wide rope. Cut into triangles.

Music Break: Dancing Drums (More Drums) - Ananda Shankar

Guest Interview Amy Sedaris Entertains 7 MIN

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Playwright Amy Sedaris walks us through her FUN approach to entertaining. She tells about her thriving cupcake business, her imaginary boyfriend, Ricky, and her rabbit, Dusty, who loves her cooking. Her book is I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence.

Amy Sedaris' Cupcakes

1 1/2 sticks of unsalted butter
1 3/4 cups of sugar

Beat well, then add:
 
Add 2 large eggs
2 Teaspoons of pure vanilla
1/2 teaspoon of salt
2 1/2 teaspoons of baking powder
2 1/2 cups of flour
1 1/4 cups of milk

Beat well, fill cups, and bake at 375 degrees for 18-20 minutes. You should get 24. I get 18, 'cause I'm doing something wrong.

Frosting
 
1 stick of unsalted butter
1 box of Domino confectioners sugar
1/4 cup half-and-half
1 teaspoon of pure vanilla

Whip for a while, color if you want. 

 

Music Break: Disc Jockey - Guy Pederson

Guest Interview Native Son Returns to Africa - Marcus Samuelsson 7 MIN

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Marcus Samuelsson, chef and co-owner of Restaurant Aquavit in New York, has received more accolades than most chefs receive in a lifetime. His new book, The Soul of a New Cuisine: A Discovery of the Foods and Flavors of Africa, reflects a journey through the exotic flavors and cuisines of Africa.


Music Break: Charlotte Mittnacht - DeVotchKa

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