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FROM THIS EPISODE

The recession is affecting people's ability to feed their families.  This week on Good Food, Michael Flood gives Evan Kleiman a tour of the LA Regional Food Bank.  He explains what kind of safety net exists for Angelenos.  Councilman Jose Huizar has a plan to get untouched food going to waste at city venues, into the hands of people in need.  James McWilliams has some ideas on how to solve the global food crisis.  Pie-a-day continues with the pie goddess herself, Rose Levy Beranbaum.  She shares tips for the flakiest crust.  Luigi Ballerini tells us why some people are calling pasta an "absurd Italian gastronomic religion."  Diwali, the Indian Festival of Lights, is coming up.  Mira Advani Honeycutt knows how to celebrate.  Plus, Jonathan Gold has a restaurant for us to try.  Laura Avery finds lots of apples at the Farmers Market.  And Ryan Farr tempts us with light and airy fried pork rinds.

Well-Preserved

Eugenia Bone

Producers:
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Candace Moyer
Connie Alvarez
Holly Tarson
Harriet Ells
Gillian Ferguson

Guest Interview LA Regional Food Bank 7 MIN

Food Bank

Michael Flood is the President and CEO of the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank.  According to Michael, one out of every eight Americans is "food insecure," which means they receive meals and groceries donated by charities.  The LA Regional Food Bank supports a network of organizations that provide and serve food to the needy.

Volunteer at the food bank by participating in sorts or drives.  You can also donate funds or products for distribution.

Guest Interview Motion to Stop Food Waste 6 MIN

Jose HuizarLA City Councilman Jose Huizar represents the 14th District of Los Angeles, which includes Eagle Rock, Boyle Heights and Downtown L.A.  Last Wednesday he filed a motion to get city venues to donate food waste to charities.  He also wants the city to be able to keep track of how much food is wasted so they can better prepare.

 

Music Break: Gimme Some Skin by Frank Penn

Guest Interview Just Food 7 MIN

Just FoodJames McWilliams is the author of Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong and How We Can Truly Eat Responsibly.  He believes that while there are many benefits to organic food, it's not possible to farm organically on a large, global scale.  In fact, he argues that some genetically modified food needs further study as proper use can possibly benefit the environment.  Read an interview with James in Newsweek.

The first part of Evan's interview with James McWilliams aired in last week's show.

Just Food

James McWilliams

Guest Interview Market Report 7 MIN

Pear

Baldwin Apple

Spago's Executive Pastry Chef Sherry Yard is getting into the Halloween spirit with fresh apples from See Canyon Farms.  She uses the slightly tart McIntosh variety and dips them in a raspberry sugar syrup made with fresh raspberries and corn syrup.  Once dipped, a shiny shell hardens around the apple creating a lollipop-like effect.

She also slices apples very thin, skins on, and poaches them in cider, water and Verjus.  She adds these poached slices into a honey-apple cake.

Mike Cirone is bringing in 14 varieties of apples this week. They range from the sweet Gala varieties to the tart Belle de Boskoop and Empire. These two tart varieties are over 100 years old. Mike Cirone's See Canyon comes to the Wednesday Santa Monica Farmers Market and to the downtown Saturday Santa Monica Farmers Market.  He should have apples until Thanksgiving.

 

S & S Apple Cake

  • 3 large (1 lb) Golden Delicious apples
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon
  • 1 oz butter
  • 1 1/2 oz heavy cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • Pinch salt

 

1. Pre-heat oven to 350°; set a rack in the middle of the oven.
2. Butter an 8-inch round x 2 inches deep, baking dish, dust with granulated sugar; set aside.
3. Peel, quarter, and core the apples. Slice them thinly. In a bowl, toss them with the lemon juice; set aside.
4. In a saucepan, melt the butter; cool to 80°. Whisk in the cream and eggs.
5. In a medium bowl, sift together, the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.
6. Gradually add the egg mixture into the flour mixture.
7. Fold in the sliced apples.
8. Pour the batter it to the baking dish, spread it evenly. Bake for 30 minutes until the top is golden and a cake tester inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Cool for 20 minutes.
9. Turn out the cake and set it right side up on a platter. Dust with confectioners' sugar. It's best served warm with a dollop of crème fraiche, or ala mode with vanilla ice cream.

Guest Interview Futurist Food 7 MIN
Futurist Painting
Abstract Speed + Sound by Giacomo Balla (1913-14)


Luigi Ballerini is a professor of Italian Literature at UCLA.  As a food historian, he has been a part of several futurist dinners.

The Futurist Movement began in 1909 when Filippo Tommaso Marinetti published his Futurist Manifesto.  In it, Marinetti expressed his disdain for the past and he embraced technology.  Gastronomy was included in this artistic movement.  Futurist meals demanded originality in food and presentation.  Pasta was shunned as was the fork and knife. 

Evan is preparing a Futurist meal on October 10 at the Fowler Museum, sponsored by Fondazione Azzurra.

  Serata Futurista

Music Break: Gimmie-A-Breaks by Q Burns Abstract Message
Guest Interview Chicharrones 3 MIN

Chicharrones Poster

Ryan Farr owns 4505 Meats.  He teaches butchering classes and makes chicharrones for bars around San Francisco. 

Chicharrones Photo

Chicharrones are fried pork rinds.  They are prepared in a variety of different ways.  Ryan's are light like potato chips.

 

Music Break: Fever (Instrumental) by Essence

Guest Interview Pie Goddess 7 MIN

Banana Cream Pie

Evan's Banana Cream Pie from Rose's Recipe

Rose Levy Beranbaum is the author of numerous books about baking including The Pie & Pastry Bible and her latest, Rose's Heavenly Cakes

Rose's Flaky Pie Crust
Yield: One 9-inch pie crust

8 Tablespoons unsalted butter, cold
1 1/3 cups plus 4 teaspoons pastry flour or bleached all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/8 tsp baking powder (optional: if not using, double the salt)
2 1/2 to 3 1/2 Tablespoons heavy cream
1 1/2 tsp cider vinegar

Divide the butter into two parts, about two-thirds to one-third (5 tablespoons and 3 tablespoons). Cut the butter into 3/4 inch cubes. Wrap each portion of butter with plastic wrap. Refrigerate the larger amount and freeze the smaller for at least 30 minutes. Place the flour, salt, and optional baking powder in a reclosable gallon-size freezer bag and freeze for at least 30 minutes.

Place the flour mixture in a food processor with the metal blade and process for a few seconds to combine. Set the bag aside. 

Add the larger amount of butter cubes to the flour and process for about 20 seconds or until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the remaining frozen butter cubes and pulse until all of the frozen butter is the size of peas. (Toss with a fork to see it better.) 

Add the lowest amount of the ice water and the vinegar and pulse 6 times. Pinch a small amount of the mixture together between your fingers. If it does not hold together, add half the remaining water and pulse 3 times.

Try pinching the mixture again. If necessary, add the remaining water, pulsing 3 times to incorporate it. The mixture will be in particles and will not hold together without being pinched. 

For tiny 1 inch tartlets, omit the baking powder and allow the processing to continue just until a ball forms. The additional mixing produces a dough that is slightly less flaky but ensures that it will not puff out of shape in the tiny molds.

Spoon the mixture into the plastic bag. (For a double-crust pie, it is easiest to divide the mixture in half at this point.) 

Holding both ends of the bag opening with your fingers, knead the mixture by alternately pressing it, from the outside of the bag, with the knuckles and heels of your hands until the mixture holds together in one piece and feels slightly stretchy when pulled. 

Wrap the dough with plastic wrap, flatten it into a disc (or discs) and refrigerate for at least 45 minutes, preferably overnight. (For a pie shell and lattice, divide it in a ratio of two thirds: one third-use about 9.5 ounces for the shell and the rest for the lattice, flattening the smaller part into a rectangle.)

 

Music Break: Love Is On The Way by Will Dailey

Rose's Heavenly Cakes

Rose Levy Beranbaum

Guest Interview Korean Pork BBQ 7 MIN

Don Dae Gam is this week's recommendation from Jonathan Gold, the Pulitzer Prize winning food writer for the L.A. Weekly.  This restaurant is owned by the same people that run Park Dae Gam (also know as Park's BBQ).  The difference is that this Korean BBQ restaurant serves primarily pork.  Jonathan recommends the crunchy seafood pancake and the pork neck.

Don Dae Gam
1145 S. Western Ave.
Los Angeles, CA
(323) 373-0700

Find Jonathan's other suggestions on the Good Food Restaurant Map.

 

 

View Good Food Restaurant Map in a larger map


Music Break: Fortune Cookie by Los Straitjackets
Guest Interview Indian Festival of Lights 6 MIN

Diwali Dancers

Diwali Saris

Mira Advani Honeycutt is the president of the L.A. Mumbai Sister City Affiliation.  The Indian Festival of Lights, or Diwali, will be celebrated on October 17.  The holiday is marked by sweet treats like Burfi and by gifts of gold jewelry.

Celebrate Diwali at Gaylord's Banquet Room on Sunday, October 11 at 6:30 p.m.  More info.

Almond Burfi

3/4 stick butter
16 oz. Ricotta cheese
1 cup sugar
1 1/2 cups milk powder
4 tbsp. crushed almonds
Pinch of cardamom powder
Few strands of saffron (soak in 2 tsps. of water for about 15 minutes, then drain, use scented water only)

Melt butter on low heat, add Ricotta cheese and stir well for 3 to 4 minutes. Add sugar and mix well, then add milk powder. Stir till mixture thickens. Add crushed almonds, pinch of cardamom and the scented saffron water to the mixture. Stir the entire  mixture well again. Take off fire and pour in a greased dish. Cool and refrigerate. Cut into squares before serving. Garnish with crushed almonds - optional.

NOTE: For different flavors try dried unsweetened coconut, crushed pistachio nuts or cashew nuts.

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