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FROM THIS EPISODE

Jonathan Bloom examines the conspicuous amounts of good food that gets thrown away, while Corby Kummer reveals the practice of recipe theft. Christine Moore makes scrumptious lollipops, Ellen Rose shares her favorite food books of 2008 and Shirley Corriher explains the chemistry of baking. Plus, chef Eric Ripert dishes up the inner-workings of Le Bernardin, Richard Shea takes us inside the sport of competitive eating and Laura Avery has a freshly Market Report.

The Flavor Bible

Karen Page

Producers:
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Thea Chaloner
Candace Moyer
Connie Alvarez
Holly Tarson
Harriet Ells

Guest Interview The Market Report 7 MIN


celery_root.jpgLaura Avery
chats with Chef DJ Olsen, from Lou Wine Bar in Hollywood, about making a soup from celery root. This ugly, crenelated tuber is related to celery but is not the root of the celery you eat with peanut butter.  It has a very subtle flavor so Chef DJ makes a soffrito or base for the soup.  Then he adds a lot of peeled celery root and adds a bit of water -- not stock.

Celery Root-Fennel Soup
Makes 5 quarts
Keeps 3 days, tightly sealed, refrigerated

Soffrito Base
12 ozs fennel bulb, cleaned of bruises, dirt; rough julienne (core OK)
6 ozs leek, white part only, 1/8" crosswise slices
3 ozs shallots, peeled, rough julienne
6 ozs peeled King Edward (or Yukon Gold) potato, large dice
1/2 Tablespoon fresh thyme leaves
1/2 bunch Italian parsley (2 ozs)
1 Tablespoon whole fennel seed
1 Tablespoon kosher salt
Pinch ground cayenne
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

Main Vegetable
3 1/2 lbs cleaned celery root (exterior of bulb completely trimmed away to solid white core; no dirt)
5 quarts filtered water
Fresh squeezed lemon juice (2 Tablespoons-plus)
Kosher salt, to taste (1 Tablespoon-plus)
2 Tablespoon crème fraîche (optional)


1. Place soffrito ingredients in small rondeau; stir until oil covers everything evenly
2. Heat to medium low; cover rondeau and sweat vegetables, stirring occasionally, until tender (10-15 minutes)
3. Wash trimmed celery roots of any residual dirt
4. Cut roots lengthwise into quarters
5. Cut quarters crosswise into 1/2-inch pieces
6. Place pieces in rondeau with sweated vegetables
7. Cover with 5 quarts filtered water
8. Bring to a light boil
9. Boil until celery root is tender, 20-25 minutes, skimming skum as it forms on the surface
10. Once celery root is tender, blend in batches, 2 minutes at a time, until batches are smooth, creamy looking
11. Season finished soup with lemon juice, salt, to taste
12. For added richness, whisk in up to 2 tablespoons crème fraîche
 
To serve, heat 8 ounces serving in sauté pan. Pour serving into pre-heated soup bowl. Drizzle a few lazy circles of finishing quality extra virgin olive oil atop soup surface. Garnish with finely minced parsley.

Shop at the supermarket for a lemon and you'll pay $1.25 each. Go to the farmers' markets and you can get them for $1.25 a pound.  Farmer Jeff Reiger from Penryn Orchard Specialties explains the many forces causing lemon prices to go up.

Jeff Reiger is known as a persimmon grower. He preserves the Japanese art of hochigaki, the practice of air-drying whole persimmons and daily massaging them in order to create a delicious sugary treat.  You can order they directly from Jeff, by going to his website.

Music break: Multiplex by Ben Neill

Guest Interview Le Bernardin 7 MIN


on_the_line.jpgAcclaimed chef Eric Ripert dishes up the inner-workings of world-famous New York seafood restaurant, Le Bernardin. His new book is titled On the Line: Inside the World of Le Bernardin.

Le Bernardin Restaurant
155 West 51st Street
New York, NY 10019
212-554-1515

Music break: Waltz for One by The Real Tuesday Weld

On the Line

Eric Ripert

Guest Interview Lollipops 7 MIN


lollipops.jpgCandy maker Christine Moore shows us how to create beautifully delicious lollipops. She is the owner of Little Flower Candy Co. in Pasadena, which makes sweet treats and more.

Little Flower Candy Co.
1424 W Colorado Blvd
Pasadena, CA 91105
626-304-4800

 

Peppermint Lollipop Recipe

 

By Christine Moore, Little Flower Candy Company in Pasadena
2 cups sugar
2/3 cup corn syrup
1/2 cup water
1 teaspoon peppermint extract (you can substitute lemon extract or cinnamon extract)
Hard candies of your choice, one or more for each lollipop

(Christine used Starlight mints, green and red peppermint hard candies, gum drops, colored sugar and silver Dragees.)

Put sugar, corn syrup and water into a medium sized pot. Do not disturb the sugar or you'll get sugar crystals on the sides of the pan. Turn heat on medium high. Gently cook sugar syrup to 300°F (measure with a candy thermometer).

Spray small or mini muffin pans or lollipop tins with cooking spray.

While the sugar syrup is cooking, place any time of hard candy you like in the pans. When the sugar syrup reaches 300°, add the peppermint extract with caution.  Room temperature liquid will make the syrup sputter and bubble. Spoon syrup carefully into the molds.  Place lollipop sticks in the molds. Place molds in the freezer for a few minutes to speed up the hardening of the lollipop.  Unmold and enjoy!

CAUTION: This is hot, hot liquid. If you're doing this with small children give them something to hold on to in order to occupy their hands so they don't stick their fingers in the molten hot liquid.

lollipop_3.jpg

 

lollipop_4.jpg

Music break: Ninety Eight Cents Plus Tax by Detroit City Limits

Guest Interview Competitive Eating 7 MIN


Kobayashi.jpgRichard Shea
takes us inside the sport of competitive eating. He is a competitive eater and belongs to the International Federation of Competitive Eating. The IFOCE is affliated with the Major League Eating. See more videos of competitive eaters.

Guest Interview Wasted Food 7 MIN


artichoke_in_landfill.jpgJonathan Bloom talks about the perfectly good food that is thrown out by supermarkets, restaurants, caterers and the average household. Tthe creator Wasted Food, Bloom is now working with a company that is looking to convert trash into usable energy.

San Francisco-based movement Replate encourages those with unwanted leftovers to place them on top of the nearest trash can so that the food doesn't go to waste.

Listen here to an extended interview with Jonathan about wasted food.

Music break: My Bad Seed by MC Honky

Guest Interview Best Food Books of 2008 7 MIN

cooks_library.jpg
Ellen Rose
, owner of The Cook's Library, finds the best food books for the holiday gift-giving season.

The Cook's Library
8373 W Third St
Los Angeles, CA 90048
323-655-3141

Baked: New Frontiers in Baking by Matt Lewis & Renato Poliafito

Urban Italian: Simple Recipes and True Stories from a Life in Food by Andrew Carmellini and Gwen Hyman

Chanterelle: The Story and Recipes of a Restaurant Classic by David Waltuck and Andrew Friedman

A Day at elBulli by Ferran Adria

The Big Fat Duck Cookbook by Heston Blumenthal


For a complete list of Ellen's favorite books, visit the Good Food blog here.

Music break: None Shall Pass by Aesop Rock

Guest Interview Stealing Recipes 7 MIN

biscotti.jpgCorby Kummer, senior editor for The Atlantic Monthly, calls attention to the practice of recipe theft. Read The Atlantic Monthly article that inspired this interview. He is the author of The Joy of Coffee: The Essential Guide to Buying, Brewing, and Enjoying - Revised and Updated.

To get Corby Kummer's Unbeatable Biscotti recipe, visit the Good Food blog.

Music break: Night Train by RevOrganDrum

The Joy of Coffee

Corby Kummer

Guest Interview The Chemistry of Baking 7 MIN


bakewise.jpgFood scientist Shirley Corriher explains the chemical world of baking in her book, BakeWise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking with Over 200 Magnificent Recipes.

 

 

Satin-Glazed Midnight Black Chocolate Cake

 

Makes one 9-inch (23-cm) 2-layer round cake

 

1 recipe Deep, Dark Chocolate Cake, prepared as two 9-inch (23-cm) round layers
1 recipe Satin-Smooth Ganache Glaze

 
1. Place one layer of the cooled cake on a cardboard circle that is slightly smaller than the cake. You want to be able to hold the cake and tilt it as necessary. Place the cake on a cooling rack over a large piece of parchment paper or a nonstick baking sheet. You want something that you can drip icing on and scrape it up if you need it.

2. Pour slightly less than half of the Satin-Smooth Ganache Glaze into a 2-cup (473 ml) measuring cup. You want the icing almost cool enough to set, about 90°F/32°C. Pour the icing to cover the cake layer, top with the second layer, and pour icing on until on the icing starts to overflow and run down the edges. Lift the cake and tilt to encourage icing to run where there isn't any. With a metal spatula, smooth the icing around the edge. Do what you can to get icing over the top and around the edges. Allow the cake to cool for about 30 minutes.

3. No spatula from here on! Heat the remaining half of the icing just until it flows easily. Strain it into a warm 2-cup (473-ml) measuring cup. Hold the cake up with your left hand (if you are right-handed), keeping it over the parchment. With your right hand, pour icing into the center of the cake. Allow the icing to run down the edges and tilt to get it to run where it is needed. Pour more icing on as needed, but do NOT touch it with a spatula. You want this coating untouched, as smooth as a lake at dawn--a perfect, shiny, dark surface. Replace the cake on the cooling rack and allow to cool. Serve at room temperature.

 

Deep, Dark Chocolate Cake
Makes one 13" x 9" x 2" (33cm x 23cm x 5cm) sheet cake or two 9" x 2" (23cm x 5cm)round layers

Nonstick cooking spray

2 3/4 cups (19.3 oz/ 546 g) sugar
3/4 tsp(4.5g) salt
3/4 cup (2.4 oz/69 g) Dutch-process cocoa powder
1 teaspoon (5 g) baking soda
1 cup (237 ml) water
1 cup (237 ml) canola oil
2 tsp (10 ml) pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups (7.7 oz/218 g) spooned and leveled bleached all-purpose flour
4 large egg yolks (2.6 oz/74 g)
2 large eggs (3.5 oz/99 g)
1/4 cup (59 ml) buttermilk

 

1. Arrange a shelf in the lower third of the oven, place a baking stone on it, and preheat the oven to 350°F/177°C.

2. Spray VERY GENEROUSLY, a 13 x 9 x 2-inch (33 x 23 x 5-cm) rectangular pan or two 9 x 2-inch (23 x 5-cm) round cake pans with nonstick cooking spray. Line the bottom of the round pans with parchment and spray on top of the parchment. With the rectangular pan, line and extend up the long sides with a piece of Release foil or parchment sprayed lightly with nonstick cooking spray.

3. In a heavy saucepan, stir together the sugar, salt, cocoa, and baking soda. In another saucepan, bring 1 cup (237 ml) water to a boil. Stirring constantly, pour boiling water a little at a time into the cocoa mixture. It will bubble up at first and then get dark and thicken. Stir the cocoa mixture briskly. Place on the heat and bring back to a boil. Turn off the heat and allow to stand in the hot saucepan for at least 10 minutes.

4. Pour the hot cocoa mixture into a mixing bowl. Add the oil and vanilla and beat on low speed for about 10 seconds. On low speed, beat the flour into the batter and then, with a minimum of beating, beat in the egg yolks, whole eggs, and buttermilk. This is a thin batter. Pour the batter into the prepared pan or pans. Place in the oven on the stone and bake until the center feels springy to the touch, about 25 minutes for round layers of 35 minutes for the sheet cake. Allow to cool in the pan for about 10 minutes on a rack. Run a thin knife around the edge and jar the edge of the pan to loosen. Invert onto the serving platter. Cool completely before icing.


Satin-Smooth Ganache Glaze
Makes about 2 1/2 Cups (591 ml)

16 ozs (454 g) semisweet chocolate
1/2 cup (118 ml) apple jelly
1 cup (237 ml) heavy cream
1/2 cup (118 ml) whole milk
1/2 cup (3.5 oz/99 g) sugar
2 Tablespoons (30 ml) light corn syrup

1. Place the chocolate in a food processor with the steel blade and finely chop.

2. In a small saucepan over medium heat, heat the jelly just to melt. Stir in the cream, milk, sugar, and corn syrup and bring carefully to a boil. Pour into a wide metal mixing bowl. All at once, dump and spread the chocolate across the top of the hot cream mixture. Jar to settle the chocolate. Allow to stand about 1 minute, then, starting in the middle, slowly stir to blend the cream and chocolate together well.

3. Divide the ganache in half. Put the cake to be frosted on a cake cardboard exactly the size of the cake. When one half of the glaze cools to 90°F/32°C follow the Double-Icing Technique.


Double-Icing Technique:

1. Place the cooled cake on a cardboard circle that is slightly smaller than the cake.  This allows you to hold the cake with the sturdy cardboard bottom and tilt it as necessary. Next, place the cake on a cooling rack that is sitting on a large piece of parchment paper or a nonstick baking sheet. You want something that catches icing drips and allows you to scrape them up if you need to.

2. Pour slightly less than half of the ganache or glaze into a 2-cup (473-ml) glass measuring cup with a spout. You want the glaze almost cool enough to set, about 90∫F/32∫C. Pour a puddle of icing in the center of the cake and continue pouring until the icing starts to overflow and run down the edges. Lift the cake and tilt to encourage the glaze to run where there isn't any. With a metal spatula, smooth the icing around the edge. Do what you can to cover the top and all around the edges. Allow the cake to cool for about 30 minutes.

3. No spatula from here on! Heat the remaining half of the ganache or glaze just until it flows easily. So that it will be perfectly smooth, strain it into a warm 2-cup (473-ml) glass measuring cup with a spout. If you are right-handed, hold the cake up with your left hand keeping it over the parchment. With your right hand, pour the glaze into the center of the cake. Allow the glaze to run down the edges and tilt to get it to run where it is needed. Pour more glaze on as needed, but do NOT touch it with a spatula. You want this coating untouched, as smooth as a lake at dawn - a perfect, shiny, dark surface. Place the cake on the cooling rack and allow to cool.

Music break: Note Crisis by Lainka and the Cosmonauts

BakeWise

Shirley O. Corriher

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