ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Farming doesn’t have to mean lush and pastoral land.  Novella Carpenter is an urban farmer, growing food and raising livestock on a dead end street 
in the middle of the Oakland ghetto.  Tezo updates us on the South Central Farmers who were evicted from their land in downtown L.A.  They’re now farming on 80 acres in Bakersfield.  Kajsa Alger of Street tells me all about Tunisian Pie.  Mark Bittman of the New York Times explains what it means to be a part-time vegan.  High-alcohol wine is popular, especially in California.  Peter Langenstein has more on this controversial trend.  Can gadgets really make wine taste better?  Jordan MacKay of Chow.com has answers.  Jonathan Gold stops by with the details on a Mexican restaurant that’s as much about the murals as it is about the food.  Plus intrepid eater Eddie Lin dines on raw chicken right here in an L.A. restaurant.  And Laura Avery reports from the Santa Monica Farmers Market.

Producers:
Bob Carlson
Jennifer Ferro
Candace Moyer
Connie Alvarez
Holly Tarson
Harriet Ells
Gillian Ferguson

Guest Interview Ay Cabron! 4 MIN, 15 SEC

Pal CabronJonathan Gold is the Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic for the L.A. Weekly.  This week he reviews Pal Cabron in Huntington Park.  They specialize in Cemitas, Clayudas and colorful murals.   

Pal Calbron
2560 E. Gage Ave.,
Huntington Park, CA
(323) 277-9899

 

See the rest of Jonathan's restaurant picks on the Good Food Restaurant Map.

Guest Interview Ghost Town Farm 7 MIN, 16 SEC

Novella Carpenter

Novella Carpenter is the author of Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer.  She owns an urban farm in Oakland where she raises turkeys, chickens, pigs, goats, rabbits and bees.

Novella's Turkeys

 

Novella's Goat

See more pictures of Novella's urban farm.

 

Music Break: Mercury by Los Straitjacket

Farm City

Novella Carpenter

Guest Interview Raw Chicken 5 MIN, 36 SEC

Eddie Lin writes the blog Deep End Dining.  He ate raw chicken with wasabi, or tori wasa, at the Japanese yakitori restaurant Torimatsu.  Listen to Eddie's audio podcast about his experience.

Torimatsu
1425 W Artesia Blvd
Gardena, CA 90248
(310) 538-5764

Find the locations of Eddie's other dining experiences on the Good Food Restaurant Map (Eddie's picks are in red):

 

View Good Food Restaurant Map in a larger map






Guest Interview Market Report 6 MIN, 56 SEC

Francois Meteigner

Chef Jean Francois Meteigner is opening La Cachette Bistro at 1712 Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica across the street from Le Merigot Hotel. It opens on August 10. He's featuring all kinds of handmade sausages including salmon sausage and smoked fish sausage.  He also makes a sauerkraut with equal parts finely chopped fennel, cabbage and onion. The chopped vegetables are marinated with vinegar and white wine overnight. 

Fennel Sauerkraut for Lightly Smoked Salmon Dish
Serves 6 people
Sauerkraut:
1 Savoy Cabbage
2 Fennels
2 Onions

Slice all vegetables very thin and add:

1/4 cup of white vinegar
1/4 cup of white wine
1 bay leaf
Thyme
10 Juniper berries
Salt

Mix everything together and place in refrigerator over night. The next day, sauté very slowly with ¼ cup of olive oil without wine and vinegar After 20 minutes, add wine and vinegar Cook 45 minutes on top of the stove, then 2 hours in the oven at 325°, covered. Check every 30 minutes, you may have to add little vegetable stock to the sauerkraut.


Salmon
6 pieces of Salmon, 7-8 oz each
1-gallon water
3/4 cup Kosher salt

Mix water with salt and add salmon to it, soak for 45 minutes. Rinse, then dry fish and put aside.

Horseradish Cream
1-cup sour cream
1/2 cup whipping cream
1 Tbsp horseradish

Boil salmon and horseradish cream sauce together for 5 minutes. Put aside and season with lemon juice, salt and a little black pepper. Put in refrigerator for 1 hour. Lightly sauté salmon on top of stove. Finish in a 350° oven for 15 minutes, keep medium rare. Serve fish on sauerkraut with Horseradish cream on the side, sprinkle with olive oil and lemon juice.  May be served with boiled potatoes, too.

 

Farmer Ed Munak comes down from Paso Robles with a number of varieties of fragrant, ripe melons and tomatoes. You'll only find Cal Trans, Wild Zebra and Caro Rich varieties at Ed's stand.  This is the height of the season for tomatoes.

Cal Trans

Wild Zebra

Caro Rich

Guest Interview Food Matters 7 MIN, 58 SEC

Mark Bittman is the food writer for the New York Times.  His most recent book is Food Matters: A Guide to Conscious Eating with More Than 75 Recipes.  He has written numerous cookbooks including How to Cook Everything.

Mark BittmanEasy Whole Grain Flatbread

1 cup whole wheat flour or cornmeal, or chickpea flour (also called besan; sold in Middle Eastern, Indian, and health food stores)
1 tsp salt
4 Tablespoons olive oil (see the headnote)
1/2 large onion, thinly sliced (optional)
1 Tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves (optional)

1. Put the flour into a bowl; add salt; then slowly add 1 1/2 cups water, whisking to eliminate lumps. Cover with a towel, and let sit while oven heats, or as long as 12 hours. The batter should be about the consistency of thin pancake batter.

2. When ready to bake, heat the oven to 450°F. Put the oil in a 12-inch rimmed pizza pan or skillet (along with the onion and rosemary if you’re using them) and put in the heated oven. Wait a couple of minutes for the oil to get hot, but not smoking; the oil is ready when you just start to smell it. Carefully remove the pan (give the onions a stir); then pour in the batter, and return the skillet to the oven. Bake 30 to 40 minutes, or until the flatbread is well browned, firm, and crisp around the edges. (It will release easily from the pan when it’s done.) Let it rest for a couple minutes before cutting it into wedges or squares.

Quinoa SaladSweet Potato and Quinoa Salad

2 1/2 cups cooked quinoa or other small-kernel grain or 1 cup raw
1 large or 2 medium (about 1 lb) sweet potatoes
Salt
1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and diced
1/4 cup minced red onion or shallot
Freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 Tablespoons balsamic, sherry, or red wine vinegar
1/4 cup minced fresh chives or parsley leaves

1. If you haven’t already, cook the quinoa or other grain. Drain in a strainer and rinse. Meanwhile, peel the sweet potato and dice it into 1/2-inch or smaller pieces. Cook it in boiling salted water to cover until tender, about 15 minutes; drain well.

2. Toss together the potato, quinoa, bell pepper, and onion; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Whisk the oil and vinegar together and toss the salad with about half of this mixture; add all or some of the rest to taste. Taste and adjust the seasoning, garnish with the chives and serve.

 

Music Break: Minority Report by Los Straitjacket

Food Matters

Mark Bittman

Guest Interview South Central Farmers Cooperative 6 MIN, 55 SEC

South Central Farmers' SignThree years ago the South Central Farmers were in the middle of a controversial and well-publicized fight with the developer that owned the land where they farmed.  They lost that fight and were evicted.  Tezo is one of the farmers and organizers of the South Central Farmers Cooperative.  The story of their fight with the developer and the city is documented in the Oscar-nominated film, The Garden.

The farmers have since relocated to an 80-acre farm in Bakersfield, CA where they are still serving their South Central community through a partnership with WORKS and through a CSA.

 

  South Central Farmers' CSA Box

South Central Farmers Cooperative CSA Box

South Central Farmers' Okra

Okra

South Central Farmers' Squash

Squash

South Central Farmers' Squash Blossoms

Squash Blossoms

 

 

Guest Interview The Big Red Debate 6 MIN, 50 SEC

In the French tradition, wine has 12 to 13 percent alcohol.  Today, many California wines have alcohol contents as high as 15 percent.  The alcohol comes from the sugar in the grapes.  The longer a grape ripens, the higher the alcohol content.  Cabernets and Syrahs from Napa Valley have higher alcohol percentages.  Read more about high alcohol wines from Chow.com.

Peter Langenstein owns Brix26, an online wine merchant specializing in California wines.

Guest Interview Wine Gadgets 8 MIN, 25 SEC

Jordan MacKay writes The Juice, a wine column for Chow.com

Wine Wand

Wine Wand works to aerate the wine by "replicating the the natural frequencies of air and oxygen."

 

 

 

 

 

Clef du Vin

The Clef du Vin contains metals that, when placed in a glass of wine, ages the wine one year for every second.

 

 

 

 

 

Aerator

The Vinturi Essential Wine Aerator is a conduit that aerates the wine when you pour it.  

 

 

 

 

 

Music Break: My Little Grass Shack by Chick Floyd

Guest Interview Tunisian Pie 4 MIN, 18 SEC

Kajsa AlgerKajsa Alger is the Executive Chef and partner with Susan Feniger in Street.  Kajsa has been making a Tunisian Pie, or brik, with carrots, chicken and an egg.

 

 

 

Music Break: Memphis by George Semper

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK