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FROM THIS EPISODE

The Missouri Highway Patrol has taken over public safety in the city of Ferguson. The new officers took a less combative approach last night, marching alongside demonstrators who are protesting the police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown last Saturday. Plus: California is considering at a bill that would redefine sexual consent on campus from an old “no means no” approach to “yes means yes.” We also look back at the Pam Smart trial and what it continues to reflect about our culture.

Banner Image: St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson taking a selfie with a protestor; Credit: Yamiche Alcindor, via Twitter

Producers:
Andrew Walsh
Christian Bordal
Matt Holzman
Jolie Myers
Anna Scott

A Different Tone in Ferguson 6 MIN, 51 SEC

Missouri Highway Patrol Captain Ronald Johnson is now in charge of public safety in Ferguson after days of protests that turned into violent confrontations with city police. The new officers took a less combative approach last night, marching along with demonstrators who are protesting the police killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown last Saturday.

Guests:
Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times (@mattdpearce)

Yes Means Yes 8 MIN, 4 SEC

The White House has been pushing college campuses to do something about the problem of sexual assault. So California is considering at a bill that would redefine consent from an old “no means no” approach to what supporters call “yes means yes.” If it passes, nearly every college in California will be required to adopt the affirmative consent standard.

Guests:
Meredith Clark, MSNBC (@MeredithLClark)

Dystopias, Sly Stallone and an Enormous Head 11 MIN, 6 SEC

Today on our weekly film roundup, things look a bit dystopic. New releases include a world without color, a world in which Sly Stallone is our only hope, and a world in which Michael Fassbender stars in a movie but we never see his face.

Guests:
Mark Ellis, Schmoes Know (@https://twitter.com/SchmoesKnow)
Kyle Buchanan, New York Magazine (@kylebuchanan)

More:
Schmoes Know
Kyle Buchanan in New York Magazine

The Trials of Pamela Smart 12 MIN, 57 SEC

Before there was the OJ Simpson trial...before the Casey Anthony trial….before Court TV…there was the trial of Pamela Smart. It was the first to be covered on live TV, with every moment in the courtroom captured. Smart, a 23-year-old woman, was accused of convincing her 15-year-old lover to kill her husband. A new documentary explores the case and how the media frenzy around the trial led to the conviction of a woman who may be innocent.

Featurette - Meet the Artists for Captivated The Trials of Pamela Smart on TrailerAddict.

Guests:
Jeremiah Zagar, director, 'Captivated: The Trials of Pamela Smart'

More:
Captivated: The Trials of Pamela Smart

Robo-Scheduling 8 MIN, 1 SEC

Almost every major chain store now has traded in old-fashioned, pen-and-paper work schedules for computer-generated ones. They use special software that analyzes sales data, delivery schedules, and even local weather forecasts to spit out the most efficient plan for which employees should work, when. It’s great for the bottom line, but not so great for many workers. Yesterday, Starbucks announced it’s changing its system to give workers more regular hours. But does this mean anything for others in similar situations?

Guests:
Jodi Kantor, New York Times (@jodikantor)

More:
New York Times: Working Anything but 9 to 5

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