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The California State Assembly votes on a measure Tuesday that would overhaul the voting process by closing many traditional polling places and sending every voter a mail-in ballot beginning in 2018.

At Superior Court in San Diego Tuesday, a former NPR producer, who had his voting rights taken away after a stroke left him with the condition known as “locked-in syndrome,” asked that his voting rights be restored.

Then, Stanford University notified students by email Monday that hard liquor will no longer be allowed at undergrad parties on campus. Administrators want to change the culture of alcohol at the school and eliminate risk, but critics say the new policy could make things worse by pushing drinking behind closed dorm room doors.

Next, Juanita Broaddrick claims Bill Clinton raped her in 1978. He was never charged, and no one knew about her story until the 1990s; but what if her story had come out now? Would she have been taken more seriously by the news media and by liberals?

And finally, in the great bagel debate, is LA finally catching up with NY?

Photo courtesy of Lucy Nicholson, Reuters 

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

California lawmakers consider major voting overhaul 7 MIN, 54 SEC

The State Assembly votes on a measure Tuesday that would overhaul the voting process, and that could mean the days of scrambling to get to a random garage, school, or storefront on election day may be ending in California. If the proposal passes, many traditional polling places would go away starting in 2018. Instead, every voter would get a mail-in ballot. Voters will still be able to vote in person, but there will be fewer polling places that will be open for several days and voters can choose go to any polling place in their county.

Guests:
John Myers, Los Angeles Times (@johnmyers)

A fight to restore voting rights for disabled in California 9 MIN, 57 SEC

Former NPR producer David Rector has a traumatic brain injury after suffering a stroke seven years ago. He now has the condition known as “locked-in syndrome”: he can’t move his limbs, and he can’t talk, but he is mentally competent. He thinks, feels, and expresses emotions. But five years ago, a judge ruled that because of his condition, he’s not allowed to vote. Rector appeared with disability advocates at the State Superior Court in San Diego Tuesday to ask that his voting rights be restored, and for people like him to be notified that, because of a new California law, they too could now be allowed to vote.

Guests:
Thomas Coleman, Director
Rosalind Alexander-Kasparik, Conservator

Will Stanford’s hard alcohol ban make students safer? 10 MIN, 4 SEC

Stanford University notified students via a surprising back-to-school email Monday, that hard liquor will no longer be allowed at undergrad parties on campus. The new policy comes after the Brock Turner sexual assault case made international news earlier this year. Both Turner and the victim were intoxicated when he assaulted her by a dumpster on campus. Administrators say they want to change the culture of alcohol at the school and eliminate risk; but critics say the new policy could make things worse by pushing drinking behind closed dorm room doors.

Guests:
Michele Dauber, Professor (@mldauber)
Katy Murphy, San Jose Mercury News (@katymurphy)

Broaddrick speaks up again about Bill Clinton rape allegations 12 MIN, 3 SEC

Fairly or not, Bill Clinton’s policy decisions and his personal indiscretions have plagued Hillary Clinton’s political fortunes, putting her supporters in a difficult position this election. How do you talk honestly about the “The Man from Hope” when your bumper sticker says “I’m With Her”? That dilemma is best represented by a name from the Clintons’ early days as a rising political couple in Arkansas: Juanita Broaddrick.

Broaddrick claims Bill Clinton raped her in 1978 when he was the Attorney General of Arkansas. He was never charged, and no one knew about her story until the 1990s, when Clinton was impeached. But what if her story had come out now? Would she have been taken more seriously by the news media and by liberals?

Guests:
Katie Baker, Buzzfeed News reporter (@katiejmbaker)

In the great bagel debate, is LA finally catching up with NY? 5 MIN

New Yorkers have long bragged that their bagels are best, and with good reason. But it looks like Los Angeles could finally be catching up in the great bagel debate, but in a distinctly LA way.

Guests:
Katherine Spiers, How It Got In Your Mouth (@katherinespiers)

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