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FROM THIS EPISODE

Georgetown University – a school that owned slaves and sold them – announced Wednesday it is taking steps towards making amends for its slave history. Descendants of those slaves applying to Georgetown will receive preferential consideration for admission. How are other universities confronting their connections to slavery?

Then, critics of the phrase “black-on-black crime,” like NPR’s Gene Demby, say people use black crime rates to derail any conversation about police violence. When did the phrase “black-on-black crime” become a conservative talking point?

Next, does smiling make you happier? A new, large-scale study suggests a complicated link between facial expressions and emotions.

Then, David Cross joins Press Play to talk about his first new standup special
in six years, called “Making America Great Again!”

And finally, there’s a new source of internet outrage inspired by an old blog post from 2013: advice on how men should to talk to women wearing headphones.


Photo courtesy of Filippo Diolatevi.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Georgetown, other universities grapple with slave histories 9 MIN, 52 SEC

The list of injustices black people have suffered in America is long, and that’s why some say they deserve reparations. Georgetown University – a school that owned slaves and sold them – announced Wednesday it is taking a step towards that. University officials have decided to give descendants of those slaves applying to Georgetown preferential consideration for admission. The school is also issuing an apology and renaming some buildings, among other measures. How are other universities confronting their connections to slavery?

Guests:
Alfred L. Brophy, Professor

How ‘black on black crime’ became a conservative talking point 8 MIN, 42 SEC

Black Lives Matters has focused the nation’s attention on violence against black people, particularly by police officers. Some have pushed back, saying the real violence against African Americans is by other African Americans – so-called “black on black crime.” Critics of the phrase, like NPR’s Gene Demby, say people use black crime rates to derail any conversation about police violence. When did the phrase become a conservative talking point?

Guests:
Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Harvard Kennedy School of Government (@KhalilGMuhammad)

Smile! Especially if you don’t feel like it 8 MIN, 50 SEC

Smile, even if you don’t feel like it. Especially if you don’t feel like it, in fact, because it will make you feel better. This is classic social psychology wisdom. Fake it ‘til you make it. Recent studies have found that Botox can ease depression by making it harder for people to frown. And now, a new, large-scale study suggests a much more complicated link between facial expressions and emotions.

Guests:
Daniel Engber, Science writer and columnist for SLATE (@danengber)

David Cross wants to make America great again 13 MIN, 49 SEC

David Cross is known as Tobias from Arrested Development and one half of the Mr. Show sketch duo. He’s also considered a comedian’s comedian, and he’s put out his first new standup special in six years. It’s called “Making America Great Again!” Though the show’s not all politics – like his impression of Matthew McConaughey accepting the Best Actor Oscar in the year 2042.

Guests:
David Cross, Actor, Comedian, Writer (@davidcrosss)

Old blog post about women wearing headphones inspires new outrage 7 MIN, 41 SEC

There’s a new source of internet outrage inspired by an old blog post from 2013: advice on how men should to talk to women wearing headphones. That and more web news in this week’s web roundup with Xeni Jardin.

Guests:
Xeni Jardin, BoingBoing.net (@xeni)

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