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FROM THIS EPISODE

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton announced he will retire after his nearly five-decade policing career. Bratton served as LA Police Chief from 2002 until 2009. In the midst of a national conversation about race and policing, we look at his impact on law enforcement in the LA. Also, six major court rulings against voter restriction laws were issued in the last two weeks, bringing voting rights front and center just months before a crucial presidential election. Next, people convicted of a sex crime in California face some of the most restrictive sex offender laws in the country, and that includes juveniles who can end up on the registry for life for “playing doctor” or sexting. Then, the Republican Party platform ratified last month supports parents choosing “conversion therapy” for their LGBTQ children. Garrard Conley is an example of the failure of that so-called treatment, and he wrote about it in his memoir, “Boy Erased.” And finally, Runyon Canyon reopens! But Press Play’s resident hiking expert Jolie Myers says LA is chock-full of other trails she would pick any day of the week over Runyon.

Image: New York Police Commissioner William Bratton is pictured while New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (R) announces Bratton's retirement at City Hall in the Manhattan borough New York, U.S., August 2, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Commissioner Bratton to end nearly 5 decade policing career 9 MIN, 13 SEC

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton announced on Tuesday that he will retire after his nearly five-decade policing career. Bratton served as Los Angeles Police Chief from 2002 until 2009. In 2002 the LAPD was plagued by scandals and racial tension, and under federal oversight. How did Bratton change LA’s police force during his seven-year tenure? In the midst of a national conversation about race and policing, we look at his impact on law enforcement in the city.

Guests:
Jim Newton, Blueprint (@newton_jim)

More:
New York City Police Commissioner Bratton to retire
BLUE PRINT

Voting rights advocates are fighting GOP voting laws and winning 7 MIN, 36 SEC

Six major court rulings against voter restriction laws were issued in the last two weeks, bringing voting rights front and center just months before the presidential election. Republican-majority legislatures passed strict voter laws in recent years, citing voter fraud mostly in states that used to fall under federal supervision when it came to protecting voting rights. But critics insist the laws discriminate against minority voters and give Republican candidates a leg up. Voting rights advocates are fighting back, and winning in states like North Carolina, Wisconsin, and Kansas.

Guests:
Ari Berman, Nation magazine (@AriBerman)

More:
6 Major GOP Voting Restrictions Have Been Blocked in 2 Weeks

Lifelong consequences for juveniles placed on sex offender list 6 MIN, 42 SEC

People convicted of a sex crime in California face some of the most restrictive sex offender laws in the country. Offenders convicted of a sex crime against a minor are placed on a sex offender registry for life, and the consequences for those who make the list are dire. Less well known, however, is that juveniles can also end up on the registry for “playing doctor,” for sexting, or for engaging in consensual sex.

Guests:
Eric Berkowitz, Attorney and Author

'Boy Erased' chronicles real-life impact of 'conversion therapy' 16 MIN, 11 SEC

The Republican Platform ratified last month says that parents should be able to choose proper medical treatment and therapy for their children. That includes “conversion therapy” to cure their gay sons and daughters of their homosexuality. Garrard Conley is an example of the failure of that scientifically-debunked treatment. Conley grew up in rural Arkansas as a Mission Baptist. His mother and father were devout and encouraged their son to minister to others. Every soul counted, especially the lost ones. But Garrard himself felt increasingly lost, because he knew that he was gay.  What happened next is the subject of Conley’s memoir, “Boy Erased,” and it chronicles his time in so-called ex-gay therapy, in an intensive program called “Love in Action.”

Guests:
Garrard Conley, Author

Boy Erased

Garrard Conley

Runyon Canyon reopens! But there are better hiking spots in LA 6 MIN, 41 SEC

Lululemon stockholders rejoice! LA’s Runyon Canyon is back open after a four-month closure so that city crews could replace a water main. Runyon is arguably the most popular hiking spot in the city, but LA is chock-full of great hiking trails. Trails that Press Play’s resident hiking expert Jolie Myers would pick any day of the week over Runyon.

Guests:
Jolie Myers, Managing Producer, 'Press Play'

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