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The Los Angeles City Council is on the verge of approving a transportation plan called “Mobility Plan 2035.” It’s supposed to get people out of their cars and cut traffic over the next 20 years. But opponents say the plan could backfire and end up increasing traffic. Many American cities, including Los Angeles, once had thriving public transit. So what happened? Then, so-called “disaster rescue organizations” promise to save you when you’re trapped on the mountain and can’t get down—all for a price of course. But their services are not available to non-paying victims of natural disasters like avalanches or earthquakes, raising touchy ethical questions about the for-profit rescue industry. Finally, if you loved the TV show Empire, you’re about to get even more from the world of Cookie and Lucius than you could have ever imagined.

Banner Image: Train leaving to Downtown LA.

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Ryan Kailath

L.A.'s New Transportation Plan 8 MIN, 8 SEC

The Los Angeles City Council is on the verge of approving a transportation plan called 'Mobility Plan 2035.' It's supposed to get people out of their cars and cut traffic over the next 20 years. But opponents say the plan could backfire and end up increasing traffic.  

Guests:
David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times (@DavidZahniser)

More:
First & Spring L.A. maps out sweeping transportation overhaul

What Happened to L.A.’s Public Transit? 8 MIN, 19 SEC

The U.S. spends more on public transportation than most European and Asian countries, but it gets much less bang for its buck. History and geography are part of the explanation: American cities are younger than the European capitals, which were built for walking. Meanwhile, our sprawling suburbs seem to call for automobiles to connect them. But that isn’t the whole story. Many American cities, including Los Angeles, once had thriving public transit. So what happened?

Guests:
Peter Norton, History professor at the University of Virginia and the author of 'Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City.'

Fighting Traffic

Peter D. Norton

Women Voters in the GOP 7 MIN, 7 SEC

Republican candidates like Donald Trump seem to be making the party’s job of attracting women voters that much harder. But there are still lots of women who are staunch supporters of the GOP. Remember: 44 percent of women voted for Mitt Romney in 2012. What does this mean for 2016?

Guests:
Ronnee Schreiber, San Diego State University

Righting Feminism

Ronnee Schreiber

For-Profit Disaster Rescue Services 11 MIN

If you like risky adventures, you’ve probably considered signing up for a disaster rescue service. These organizations promise to save you when you’re trapped on the mountain and can’t get down—all for a price of course. But their services are not available to non-paying victims of natural disasters like avalanches or earthquakes. This has raised some touchy ethical questions about the for-profit rescue industry.

Guests:
Abe Streep, contributing editor for Outside Magazine (@abestreep)

More:
The Tricky Ethics of the Lucrative Disaster Rescue Business

TV Roundup: Empire Spin-off and More 10 MIN, 45 SEC

If you loved the TV show Empire, you’re about to get even more from the world of Cookie and Lucius than you could have ever imagined. Fame, fortune and spin-offs. That and more on our TV roundup.

Guests:
Michael Schneider, Indiewire / Variety (@Franklinavenue)
Eric Deggans, NPR (@Deggans)

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