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A Justice Department investigation has found that Baltimore Police routinely discriminated against black citizens for years. Since 2000, the DoJ has scrutinized almost two dozen police forces around the country. How does Baltimore compare? And have reforms improved policing? Then, UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi resigned Tuesday after being accused of nepotism, false statements, and misuse of student funds. Rising salaries and extravagant perks for university presidents are coming under increasing scrutiny during a time of increasing student tuition. Next, before the Olympics kicked off, critics were focused on whether first-time host Rio De Janiero could pull off the games. However, the criticism has shifted to a more familiar target: long-time exclusive Olympics broadcaster NBC. And, like other Olympic host cities before it, Rio has faced major cost overruns and a long list of problems. But does it have to be this way? Is it time to reimagine the Olympics. Finally, how do you know whether amusement park or water park rides are safe enough to ride?

Banner Image: Brazilian Marines walk past Olympic rings as they patrol Copacabana Beach during the 2016 Rio Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 10, 2016. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Justice Department investigation finds police bias in Baltimore 9 MIN, 33 SEC

A Justice Department investigation has found that the Baltimore Police Department has routinely discriminated against black citizens for years. The report issued Wednesday comes after a yearlong investigation following the death of Freddie Gray in April, 2015. Baltimore isn’t the only department that’s been investigated for biased policing by the Obama administration. Since 2000, the Department of Justice has scrutinized almost two dozen police forces around the country. How does Baltimore compare? And have reforms improved policing?

Guests:
Samuel Walker, University of Nebraska at Omaha

More:
Why the DOJ believes its report on Baltimore Police will be different from all the others

The extravagance of UC Presidents and what’s being done about it 8 MIN, 32 SEC

UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi resigned Tuesday after being accused of nepotism, false statements, and misuse of student funds. UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks is also under investigation for using school funds for travel and other extravagances, including installing an escape hatch that enables him to tunnel out of the administration building during student protests. Rising salaries and extravagant perks for university presidents are coming under increasing scrutiny during a time of increasing student tuition.

Guests:
James Finkelstein, George Mason University

More:
UC Davis chancellor resigns following probe into ethical violations

Critiquing NBC's exclusive Olympics coverage 7 MIN, 19 SEC

Before the Olympics kicked off, critics were focused on whether first-time host Rio De Janeiro could pull off the games. However, the criticism has shifted to a more familiar target: long-time Olympics broadcaster NBC.

Guests:
Jen Chaney, Vulture

More:
4 Ways NBC’s Olympics Coverage Could Be Better

Re-Imagining the Olympics 14 MIN, 11 SEC

Rio de Janeiro struggled to prepare to host the Summer Olympic Games. Brazil is in a recession, and less than two months before the games began, Rio’s Governor had to declare a state of emergency to access funding for the preparations. Now some estimates put cost overruns for the Games at $ 1.6 billion. And despite the Olympic fanfare viewers watching at home see, a myriad of problems continue to spring up now that the Games are underway – shoddy housing arrangements, security scares, terrible traffic, polluted water, and of course, Zika...the list of problems goes on and on, as it seems to every Games. But does it have to be this way? It’s time to reimagine the Olympics.

Guests:
Andrew Zimbalist, Smith College
Paul Christesen, Dartmouth College

More:
Sport and Democracy in the Ancient and Modern Worlds - by Paul Christesen

Circus Maximus

Andrew Zimbalist

Who's regulating amusement, water park rides? 7 MIN, 9 SEC

A 10-year-old boy was killed earlier this week on a waterslide in Kansas City. The accident is raising a lot of questions about amusement park safety. As it turns out, there is very little regulation of water slides and roller coasters. Six states have no amusement park regulations at all. So how do you know whether amusement or water park rides are safe enough to ride?

Guests:
Helaine Olen, journalist and author (@helaineolen)

More:
A Boy Died on This Water Slide—in One of the Many States That Barely Ensure That Rides Are Safe

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