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The killing of black men by police is once again in the news. Protests erupted Tuesday in Charlotte, North Carolina after police shot and killed a 43-year-old black man named Keith L. Scott. Police say that Scott was armed and posed a deadly threat. In LA, the Police Commission ruled this week that officers had violated deadly force rules in two separate shootings last year. Meanwhile in Tulsa, Oklahoma, an officer shot and killed an unarmed black man named Terence Crutcher on Friday after the 40-year-old’s car had broken down in the middle of a two-lane highway. Press Play spoke with National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward about the latest police shootings. Ward’s new book, “The Fire this Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race,” was inspired, in part, by the killing of unarmed black men and women by police. Next, Rep. Loretta Sanchez lags behind her opponent Kamala Harris in the US Senate race, but she still sees a path to victory. Sanchez joined Press Play to discuss how she’s trying to appeal to Republican voters, as well as what her proudest achievements have been over her nearly 20-year congressional career. And finally, it turns out nature documentaries fake quite a lot, like adding sound effects in post-production. Are filmmakers being dishonest or is a certain amount of fakery to be expected? 

Image: Eight-year-old Angelo Estes Jr. calls for the arrest of Officer Betty Shelby, who shot dead unarmed motorist Terence Crutcher, with other protesters outside the Tulsa Police headquarters in Tulsa, Oklahoma. REUTERS/Nick Oxford

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

'Fire this Time' author speaks on race, latest police shootings 16 MIN, 2 SEC

Protests erupted Tuesday in Charlotte, North Carolina after police shot and killed a 43-year-old black man named Keith Lamont Scott. The officer who shot him was also black. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney said Wednesday that Scott was armed and posed a deadly threat. But at the scene, a woman who identified herself as Scott’s sister said he was reading a book and waiting for his son to be dropped off by the school bus.

In Los Angeles, the Police Commission ruled this week that officers had violated deadly force rules in two separate shootings last year. The LAPD shot 36 people last year, killing 21 of them. Meanwhile in Tulsa, Oklahoma, a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black man named Terence Crutcher on Friday after the 40-year-old’s car had broken down in the middle of a two-lane highway. Tulsa police released helicopter and dash cam video of the shooting this week, which Police Chief Chuck Jordan called very disturbing and difficult to watch. Chief Jordan made a promise to his community that justice will be served; but many are skeptical because in cases like this, murder or manslaughter convictions are rare. Press Play spoke with National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward about the latest police shootings. Ward’s new book, “The Fire this Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race,” was inspired, in part, by the killing of unarmed black men and women by police.  

Guests:
Jesmyn Ward, Author

More:
Police Commission faults LAPD officers in two deadly shootings

The Fire This Time

Jesmyn Ward

US Senate candidate Loretta Sanchez on GOP voters and her path to victory 11 MIN, 7 SEC

With election day just seven weeks away, US Senate candidate Loretta Sanchez lags behind her opponent Kamala Harris by 22 points, according to a recent Field Poll. But Representative Sanchez still sees a path to victory. Sanchez joined Press Play to discuss how she’s trying to appeal to Republican voters, as well as about her record and what her proudest achievements have been over her nearly 20 year congressional career.

Guests:
Loretta Sanchez, Congresswoman (@LorettaSanchez)

More:
U.S. Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez 46 District of California

How 'natural' are nature documentaries? 11 MIN, 4 SEC

The signature scene in the Oscar-winning 1958 Disney documentary “White Wilderness” features a mass suicide of lemmings. That scene was disturbing for the faint of heart, but that’s not why the film is now infamous. It turned out the whole thing was staged and the lemmings did not voluntarily jump to their deaths – they were pushed to their deaths by the film crew. Filmmakers have gotten better about not engaging in outright animal cruelty these days, but nature documentaries still fake quite a lot, like adding sound effects in post-production. Are filmmakers being dishonest or is a certain amount of fakery to be expected?


Guests:
Elizabeth Lopatto, the Verge

More:
How natural are nature documentaries?

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