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FROM THIS EPISODE

The Supreme Court sent a case about contraception and religious freedom back to the lower courts Monday in an attempt to avoid a deadlock. The non-decision highlights how the vacant ninth seat is becoming an issue.

Also, affordable housing is a major issue in California's big cities and now Governor Jerry Brown is stepping in at the state level. He's proposed streamlining the permitting process for housing developments that include affordable units in his new budget.

On our weekly TV segment, network upfronts, summer comedies and fall reboots.

Then, nearly fifty years ago, Mexican-American women were sterilized against their wishes at Los Angeles County General hospital. The new documentary called No Más Bebés explores how they were affected.

And finally, Ghost in the Shell casting exposes Japanese animation's troubled history with 'white-washing.'

Photo: Sister Loraine McGuire with Little Sisters of the Poor speaks to the media after Zubik v. Burwell was heard by the US Supreme Court in Washington March 23, 2016. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Laura Swisher
Sarah Sweeney

SCOTUS Non-Decision in Contraceptive Case Highlights Court’s Vacancy 9 MIN, 21 SEC

The Supreme Court issued a non-decision Monday in a case about contraception, the Affordable Care Act and religious freedom. At issue was whether Obamacare’s mandate to provide free birth control is a substantial burden on a religious organization. The eight justices asked the two sides to work out a compromise in the lower courts. The unanimous decision to send the case back to the appellate level is an attempt to avoid a 4-4 deadlock. And it highlights how the court’s empty ninth seat has become an issue as the term winds down and Congress continues to refuse to hold a hearing on the nomination of Merrick Garland.

Guests:
Lisa McElroy, Drexel University (@ProfLisaMcElroy)

Could State-Level Efforts Help Solve LA's Housing Crisis? 7 MIN, 45 SEC

Affordable housing is a major issue in California’s big cities and now it’s a state-level public policy issue with Governor Jerry Brown stepping in. In his new budget, Brown has proposed streamlining the permitting process for housing developments that include affordable units. The governor also supports a measure that would use some funds earmarked for mental health to build housing. Los Angeles is one of the least affordable cities in the US, and has the nation’s largest homeless population. Could state-level efforts make a difference?

Guests:
Robert Kleinhenz, Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation (@LAEDC)

TV: Finales, Upfronts, Summer Comedies and Fall Reboots 8 MIN, 28 SEC

It’s goodbye for now to many of our favorite TV shows this week. RuPaul’s Drag Race, Bates Motel, and Jane the Virgin have their season finales Monday. It’s also goodbye for good for CBS’s Mike and Molly and ABC’s Castle. However, there are plenty of good shows to look forward to, including some great comedies this summer. And the networks are announcing their fall schedules this week in New York. Reboots of old TV shows like Prison Break and movies like The Exorcist are among the many offerings this Fall.

Guests:
Michael Schneider, Indiewire / Variety (@Franklinavenue)

'No Más Bebés' Examines LA County Forced Sterilizations 14 MIN, 49 SEC

When someone uses the word eugenics -- the genetic engineering of people -- it conjures up the horrors of Nazi Germany. But not so long ago, a more subtle kind of eugenics was carried out right here in the US, in the form of sterilizations performed by states. Many sterilizations took place at the Los Angeles County General hospital, where at least one hundred women, mostly poor, Latina immigrants, were sterilized when they came to the hospital to have their babies. Was it a case of social engineering? The new documentary No Más Bebés asks that question and tells the story of ten of these women who sued the hospital in 1975.

Guests:
Virginia Espino, Producer of 'No Mas Bebes' (@VirgiEspino)

Anime's Troubled History of 'White-Washing' 8 MIN, 42 SEC

News that Scarlett Johansson would play the lead role in a live-action remake of Japanese animation favorite Ghost in the Shell angered anime fans in America, who complained it was another example of Hollywood ‘white-washing’ of a Japanese character. However, many fans in Japan don’t see what the big deal is. One reporter explores the complicated history of representation in Japanese animation.

Guests:
Emily Yoshida, Grantland.com (@EmilyYoshida)

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