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FROM THIS EPISODE

There are 34 candidates running to fill Barbara Boxer’s Senate seat and polls say that somewhere between a third and half of voters are undecided.

Also, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has ordered that the tiny houses for the homeless in South L.A. he recently had removed be returned. We’ll check in with the man behind them.

Next, the murder of a Honduran activist has members of the U.S. Congress questioning American aide to the Central American country.

After that, the internet and social media have ushered in a ‘new comedy economy’ for comics. Is that good for funny?

And finally, we’ll talk about HBO’s big weekend on our weekly TV roundup.

Banner Image: Sen. Barbara Boxer at her victory rally on election night, Nov. 2, 2010; Credit: Neon Tommy via Flickr

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Laura Swisher
Sarah Sweeney

Will the Crowded Field to Fill Boxer's Senate Seat Confuse Voters? 8 MIN, 40 SEC

There are 34 candidates running to fill Barbara Boxer’s Senate seat, but only the top two Democrats and three Republicans will be included Monday night in the first debate of the race. That means 29 candidates will likely be unfamiliar to most voters. Although California is a solidly Democratic state when it comes to the Senate, polls says that somewhere between a third and half of voters are undecided.

Guests:
Raphael Sonenshein, California State University, Los Angeles (@SonensheinPBI)

Returning Tiny Houses to the Homeless 5 MIN, 22 SEC

Elvis Summers builds houses for the homeless in L.A. Tiny houses – 6 feet wide and 8 feet long. He’s given away 37 mini-homes so far, but in February, the Los Angeles Department of Sanitation confiscated about a dozen of them from a South L.A. sidewalk. At the time, the mayor’s office said at the time that the structures were unsafe, but now Garcetti’s done an about-face. His office said recently that the city will return the impounded houses, however, it’s still unclear where they will end up.

Guests:
Elvis Summers, My Tiny House Project LA

More:
Press Play's Anna Scott on the houses

Murder of Honduran Activist Prompts US Congress to Question Aide 8 MIN, 38 SEC

Following the murder of Honduran activist Berta Caceres, who was shot dead in her home last month, 60 members of the U.S. Congress are questioning a $750 million aid package designated for parts of Central America, including Honduras. The lawmakers asked in a letter to Secretary of State John Kerry that some aid be withheld pending an independent investigation of her death. Caceres was internationally known for her work opposing a hydroelectric dam in a rural part of Honduras, and some suspect that the military and police were complicit in her murder, and that the Honduran government is now involved in a cover-up.

Guests:
Silvio Carrillo, freelance independent journalist (@angryburrito)

The 'New Comedy Economy' 13 MIN, 50 SEC

For today's hardcore comedy fans, there is no shortage of ways to watch comics, from comedy clubs to TV. The internet and social media have ushered in even more new platforms and ways to find comedy content, like podcasts, online content providers like Netflix or Hulu, and websites like Funny or Die and College Humor, not to mention Twitter, Vine, and Instagram. In this month’s issue of Wired Magazine, writer Brian Rafferty asserts that we are in the midst of a comedy revolution, and that there is a new comedy economy. How are comics adapting to it? Comedians Phoebe Robinson and Brandon Johnson talk about what it's like to be funny in today's media landscape.


Robinson and Jessica Williams host WNYC's "2 Dope Queens"
Photo: WNYC Studios

Guests:
Brian Raftery, Wired (@BrianRaftery)
Phoebe Robinson, 2 Dope Queens (@dopequeenpheebs)
Brandon Johnson, actor and comedian

TV Roundup: Can HBO Remain Supreme? 9 MIN, 10 SEC

HBO had a big weekend. Beyonce dropped a surprise hour-long visual album on Saturday.

On Sunday, its popular shows Game of Thrones, Veep, and Silicon Valley returned. Looking ahead, though, HBO may be in some trouble. Girls is ending, as is The Leftovers; and the big budget show Vinyl has been disappointing. Amazon and Netflix are getting a lot of attention for their original shows. Can HBO remain supreme in the premium television realm?

Guests:
Eric Deggans, NPR (@Deggans)

More:
Eric’s Game of Thrones Review

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