ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

When Bernie Sanders addressed his supporters after conceding the presidential nomination to Hillary Clinton in June, he vowed that the political revolution would continue. Since then, Sanders has launched a new political group called Our Revolution. But even as he spoke to supporters Wednesday about keeping the movement alive, turmoil within the group is already threatening to derail the revolution.

Then, Native Americans and environmentalists have come together from all over the country to protest an oil pipeline they say would disturb sacred land and threaten water supplies.

Also, unlike some other cases involving Nazi-looted art in recent years, a California district court judge has ruled the Norton Simon Museum has a right to keep two 500-year-old German renaissance paintings of Adam and Eve.

Next, Todd Marinovich was a rising football star before he fell dramatically because of drug use, ending up in prison and rehab, at times homeless. But lately, Marinovich was painting murals around Orange County and thought to be clean and sober before he was arrested again last Friday.

And finally, lovers of LA history and old school kitsch have been bummed out by rumors that the venerable Chinatown restaurant Hop Louie may be closing.

Photo courtesy of Saul Gonzalez. 

Producers:
Matt Holzman
Anna Scott
Jolie Myers
Christian Bordal
Sarah Sweeney

Turmoil inside Bernie Sanders’ group threatens the revolution 10 MIN, 12 SEC

When Bernie Sanders addressed his supporters after conceding the presidential nomination to Hillary Clinton in June, he vowed that the political revolution would continue. Well, Sanders has launched a new political group called Our Revolution. But the revolution could be over before it even starts – as many as eight key staffers have quit since campaign manager Jeff Weaver became the group’s new president; and that’s just one part of the internal struggle going on at Revolution Headquarters.

Guests:
Edward-Isaac Dovere, Politico (@IsaacDovere)

Turmoil inside Bernie Sanders’ group threatens the revolution 10 MIN, 12 SEC

When Bernie Sanders addressed his supporters after conceding the presidential nomination to Hillary Clinton in June, he vowed that the political revolution would continue. Well, Sanders has launched a new political group called Our Revolution. But the revolution could be over before it even starts – as many as eight key staffers have quit since campaign manager Jeff Weaver became the group’s new president; and that’s just one part of the internal struggle going on at Revolution Headquarters.

Guests:
Edward-Isaac Dovere, Politico (@IsaacDovere)

Dakota pipeline protests continue, judge reschedules hearing 8 MIN, 44 SEC

Native Americans and environmentalists have come together from all over the country to protest an oil pipeline they say would disturb sacred land and threaten water supplies. If completed, the pipeline would transport oil nearly 1,200 miles from the oilfields of North Dakota southeast diagonally to Illinois – a length comparable to the now-dead Keystone XL pipeline. Demonstrators have been camped out for months now along parts of the proposed route hoping this pipeline, known as the Dakota Access pipeline, will meet a similar fate. Many converged on Washington on Wednesday, where a federal judge rescheduled an injunction hearing for Sept. 14.

Guests:
Vincent Schilling, Editor (@VinceSchilling)

More:
Indian Country Today

Court rules Norton Simon Museum can keep Nazi-looted masterpieces 9 MIN, 40 SEC

Another case of art taken by the Nazis from Jews during World War II has been working its way through the California courts. At stake are two of the Norton Simon Museum’s most prized masterpieces: 500-year-old German renaissance paintings of Adam and Eve. However, unlike in some other cases in recent years, a California district court judge has ruled the museum has a right to keep the art.

Guests:
Carolina Miranda, Los Angeles Times (@cmonstah)

The many highs and lows in the life of Todd Marinovich 12 MIN, 27 SEC

Say the name Todd Marinovich and football fans will shake their heads. Back in the late 1980s and early ‘90s, Marinovich was considered a future NFL star, arriving at USC with magazines hyping him as a “robo-quarterback,” with the abilities of a test-tube athlete. That was due in large part to an infamous training and diet regimen devised by his hard-charging father Marv. Marinovich played professional football for the then-Los Angeles Raiders, but was soon cut because he couldn’t resist drugs and alcohol. Since then, he’s been arrested countless times, spent time in prison and rehab, and has been homeless. But lately, Marinovich was thought to be clean and sober. He was painting murals around Orange County and his artwork appeared in local galleries. But he was arrested again last Friday after being seen wandering around naked, holding a paper bag with drugs and paraphernalia inside.

Guests:
Mike Sager, journalist (@therealsager)

Will Hop Louie become LA’s latest victim of gentrification? 7 MIN, 46 SEC

Lovers of LA history and old school kitsch have been bummed out by rumors that the venerable Chinatown restaurant Hop Louie may be closing. The three-tiered pagoda across the street from the galleries of Chung King Road has been there since 1941. The windowless ground-floor bar has been a hipster hotspot for years, though the restaurant upstairs hasn’t won over many foodies lately. Hop Louie is an institution in Chinatown, but might it become the latest victim of downtown gentrification?

Guests:
Chris Nichols, Los Angeles magazine (@ChrisNicholsLA)

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED