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FROM THIS EPISODE

Comcast wants to acquire Time-Warner Cable, setting-off alarm bells for antitrust advocates. We untangle the web of TV alternatives to figure out if we even need cable anymore. Plus, how a government aid organization is trying to change the narrative coming out of Afghanistan through photos. We also talk to the authors of a new book about relationship weight, and we find out why commercial radio stations are offering less and less variety.

Banner Image: Steve Garfield

Producers:
Andrew Walsh
Christian Bordal
Matt Holzman
Jolie Myers
Anna Scott

The Alternatives to Cable 7 MIN, 51 SEC

There are a head-spinning number of ways to watch TV these days that don’t even involve a cable box. And that’s the argument Comcast is going to make as it defends its acquisition of Time-Warner Cable. We untangle the web of TV alternatives to figure out what our options are and what they will be in the future.

Guests:
Cynthia Littleton, Editor-in-chief, Variety (@Variety_Cynthia)

Spinning Afghanistan 8 MIN, 11 SEC

The federal aid agency USAID is looking for photographers in Afghanistan to capture the good-news stories coming out of the country, to counter all the “negative” photos that journalists are snapping. The job posting rubbed some White House critics the wrong way, given the way the Obama administration has regularly gone around journalists to spin its own stories.

Guests:
Rajiv Chandrasekaran, Washington Post (@rajivwashpost)

Love Me Slender 12 MIN, 28 SEC

Everyone knows that once you settle into a relationship, it’s easy to pack on the pounds. Now two researchers are looking into how couples deal with this, and why the opposite isn’t true. After all, having a partner should make healthier living easier, since both people in the relationship can support each other.

Guests:
Thomas Bradbury, co-founder, UCLA Relationship Institute
Benjamin Karney, co-founder, UCLA Relationship Institute

Love Me Slender

Thomas N. Bradbury Ph.D.

Radio Reacts to the Internet 7 MIN, 13 SEC

Music lovers have more options than ever when it comes to checking out new music. Online services like Pandora, Spotify and Rhapsody have radio stations worried about keeping listeners. But instead of competing by offering more diverse programming, most stations are offering LESS variety and less new music. And it seems to be working.

Guests:
Hannah Karp, Wall Street Journal (@HannahJKarp)

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