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Photo: Demonstrators march outside the Trump Building at 40 Wall St. as part of a protest against America’s refugee ban in New York, U.S., March 28, 2017. (Lucas Jackson / Reuters)

Deadline looms for companies wanting to build the border wall 10 MIN, 31 SEC

Hundreds of companies reportedly say they are interested in building the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, including many from California. Final bids are due April 5. There are some requirements: The wall needs to be at least 30 feet tall and should be aesthetically pleasing on the U.S. side.

Guests:
Phillip Molnar, San Diego Union Tribune (@PhillipMolnar)

More:
Companies wanting to build Trump's border wall must first build fake ones in San Diego

Novel about Nazi looted art reveals link between Vienna, LA and the Holocaust 13 MIN, 55 SEC

The new novel “The Fortunate Ones” revolves around a piece of Nazi-looted art as it goes from Vienna to Los Angeles, where it disappears again. But the book is really about the bond between an old and young woman and the similarities they share, despite more than a half century between them.


Ellen Umansky is author of “The Fortunate Ones” (Photo courtesy of Sam Zalutsky)

Guests:
Ellen Umansky, New York Times, Slate and Salon; Author of “The Fortunate Ones" (@umanskyellen)

The Fortunate Ones

Ellen Umansky

What's behind our information polarization? 16 MIN, 58 SEC

The Fairness Doctrine was revoked in the 1980s, leading to the rise of right wing talk radio in the 90s. Veteran newsman Ted Koppel has said that’s why we have such a poisoned media climate. We discuss fairness, fake news, and whether we can overcome political polarization.

Guests:
Bill Handel, KFI Radio host (@billhandelshow)
Joy-Ann Reid, “AM Joy” on MSNBC; and co-editor of the book “We Are the Change We Seek: The Speeches of Barack Obama.” (@JoyAnnReid)
Norman Ornstein, American Enterprise Institute / Atlantic (@NormOrnstein)

More:
A polarized America
Everything you need to know about the Fairness Doctrine in one post

UC Berkeley scientist finds meaning in the nut-gathering habits of squirrels 7 MIN, 5 SEC

The behaviors of squirrels could help scientists understand animal intelligence. It explains why researchers at UC Berkeley have been walking around campus making clicking noises to lure squirrels, and giving them hazelnuts embedded with microchips. In an effort to map their nut-storing patterns.


Mikel Delgado is a doctoral researcher at UC Berkeley (Photo courtesy of Delgado)

Guests:
Mikel Delgado, UC Berkeley (@mikel_maria)

More:
How do squirrels think? This Berkeley lab is studying the revered campus rodent to find out

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