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National violent crime rates rose in 2015, FBI says 6 MIN, 29 SEC

Violent crime in America has been decreasing for 20 years. Over all, the trend is still very good. But the FBI reports today that, in 2015, there was a jump in the nationwide murder rate of 10.8 percent. Devlin Barrett of the Wall Street Journal started reporting on crime in the 1990s, the decade he calls "the battle years."

Guests:
Devlin Barrett, Wall Street Journal (@DevlinBarrett)

A presidential campaign as a personal investment 31 MIN, 55 SEC

When he was a candidate for the GOP presidential nomination some years ago, billionaire Steve Forbes carefully separated his personal businesses from his campaign. As New York Mayor, Michael Bloomberg followed the same practice. Donald Trump is doing what no rich White House contender has done before: freely and openly mixing business and politics. When he first announced, Trump boasted that he could make money running for president -- and he's making good on his promise. Trump's campaign has bought travel on his plane, rented his facilities, bought his steaks and paid his personal staff — all for more than $8 million. Nobody says that's illegal, but the Trump Foundation may have violated civil law by using other peoples' donations to finance Trump's personal lifestyle. We compare Trump's campaign to those of past billionaire candidates — and hear about potential conflicts of interest if he takes charge of federal policies.

Guests:
Lloyd Mayer, Notre Dame University (@NDNonprofitProf)
Paul Waldman, American Prospect / Washington Post / The Week (@paulwaldman1)
Julie Bykowicz, Associated Press (@bykowicz)
Norman Eisen, Brookings Institution (@NormEisen)

More:
Mayer on the difference between Trump, Clinton Foundation mistakes
Waldman on Trump running the 'sleziest' foundation in America

What's gone wrong with our political language 11 MIN, 27 SEC

On the eve of this year's first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, what's the state of our political language in 2016? We talk with a man who should know. Mark Thompson once headed the BBC. He's now Chief Executive of the New York Times. Anybody who has led two of the most authoritative journalistic institutions in the English speaking world would be worth talking to for that reason alone. But Thompson is author of the new book Enough Said: What's Gone Wrong with the Language of Politics, which speaks to the decline of public trust in public institutions — in the Britain, in Europe and in the United States.

Guests:
Mark Thompson, New York Times

Enough Said

Mark Thompson

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