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Photo: Police use a water cannon to put out a fire started by protesters during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, November 20, 2016. (Stephanie Keith/Reuters)

Trump's free-wheeling transition 6 MIN, 32 SEC

Donald Trump's nominee for Ambassador to the United Nations and his choice to be Secretary of Education have added a touch of diversity to his early selections. As UN Ambassador he's named South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley, a descendent of immigrants from India. He's named Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education. Nancy Cook, senior reporter on the transition for Politico, has more on Trump's selections.

Guests:
Nancy Cook, Politico (@nancook)

American-Indian wars, 21st century style 33 MIN, 57 SEC

The Thanksgiving holiday celebrates the supposedly peaceful partnership between early European settlers and the natives who lived in America first. But while much of the country sits down to dinner, a very different historical pattern is playing out again near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. A Native American protest against an oil pipeline has been met with tear gas, water cannons and rubber bullets. It's aroused attention all over the world. As Jane Fonda plans to serve the protesters thanksgiving dinner, can President Obama make a lasting difference? We get an update.

Guests:
Sandy Tolan, University of Southern California / Los Angeles Times (@sandy_tolan)
Charon Asetoyer, Native American Women's Health Education Resource Center (@charonasetoyer)
Tom Seng, University of Tulsa (@utulsa)
Tom Disselhorst, attorney
Mark Trahant, University of North Dakota (@TrahantReports)

More:
New York Times editorial on the power imbalance at the pipeline protest
The Guardian on officials blaming Standing Rock protesters for seriously injuring one of their own

The heartland's opioid epidemic and a vote for Trump 9 MIN, 19 SEC

The cruel scourge of opiate addiction in America's heartland is described this way by reporter Sam Quinones: "Kids with no criminal record, star athletes, pastors' cops' and mayors' kids all got addicted.  Parents [with high expectations] were confronted instead by late-night collect calls from jail, lying, stealing and conniving." On tour for his book,  Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic, Quinones made a connection between those tragic conditions and support for Donald Trump's presidential campaign.

Guests:
Sam Quinones, journalist and independent producer (@samquinones7)

Dreamland

Sam Quinones

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