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FROM THIS EPISODE

The FBI is trying to crack down on tech giant Apple — using a law passed in 1789. We hear how a case pitting national security against iPhone privacy might lead to an act of Congress.

Later on the progrmam, Britain has set the date for a popular vote on whether to leave the European Union. The Prime Minister wants to stay. The Mayor of London wants to go.

Photo: Apple CEO Tim Cook explains Apple's encryption and privacy policies (Wall Street Journal)

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Evan George
Paul von Zielbauer

Obama's Last-ditch Plan to Close Gitmo 6 MIN, 30 SEC

President Obama's first order as President was to close the prison at Guantánamo Bay. Today, he presented his latest case based on details drawn up by the Pentagon.

Molly O'Toole covers national security and politics for Foreign Policy magazine.

Guests:
Molly O'Toole, Foreign Policy magazine (@mollymotoole)

More:
Marco Rubio on Obama's plan to close Guantánamo Bay

Does the FBI Need a Back Door to Your Data? 34 MIN, 40 SEC

The FBI demands that Apple provide access to a dead terrorist Syed Farook's iPhone, which might contain evidence in December's deadly attack in San Bernardino. But Apple says the privacy of every other iPhone user could be lost forever, and it's challenging the power of government in the Era of Smart Phones. Complicating the issue, the FBI is using a law passed about the time that Benjamin Franklin discovered electricity. We update the case in more ways than one.

Guests:
Kim Zetter, Wired Magazine (@KimZetter)
Christopher Soghoian, ACLU Speech, Privacy and Technology Project (@csoghoian)
Susan Hennessey, Brookings Institution / Lawfare (@Susan_Hennessey)
Robert Levine, journalist and author (@RobertBLevine_)

More:
Zetter on the facts, misinformation in Apple's battle with the FBI
Zetter on Zuckerberg supporting Apple in fight with FBI over iPhone privacy
Hennessey on the 'overreach' of Apple's rhetoric in FBI case
Levine's 'How Digital Parasites Are Destroying the Culture Business, and How the Culture Business Can Fight Back'

Britain Debates Leaving the European Union 8 MIN, 48 SEC

In June, the British people will vote on whether to leave the European Union. It's an international issue that's inflamed personal conflict between two of the country's leading politicians.

The date has been set for a vote that could make history for the European Union. The British people will vote on whether to leave the European Union. Prime Minister David Cameron says it should stay. The Lord Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, says it's time to go. Michael Goldfgarb, former London correspondent for NPR, is now a contributor to Politico Europe.

Guests:
Michael Goldfarb, freelance journalist (@MGEmancipation)

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