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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Obama today called for "a new beginning" for the US and Muslims around the world.  Was there a call for actions to back up his words? Did he reach young people on the Arab street? Will his words make a difference to Israelis and Palestinians? What about Muslims in other parts of the world? We sample reactions from a variety of sources. Also, Newt Gingrich has thought better about calling Sonia Sotomayor a "racist." We look at what she said eight years ago and what her audience thought then.


White House photo: Pete Souza

Dreams and Shadows

Robin Wright

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Gary Scott
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook Racism in Sotomayor's 2001 'Latina' Talk? 6 MIN, 50 SEC

Newt Gingrich has backed off and even Rush Limbaugh has moderated his tone after both claimed that Judge Sonia Sotomayor was a “racist.”  It's all about a 2001 speech she made at Bolt Hall Law School at the University of California, Berkeley. So what did the audience think then? Sotomayor said that what she called a “wise Latina” would usually reach a better judicial conclusion than a white male. That set off an outcry from opponents to her appointment to the US Supreme Court. Naftali Bendavid is national correspondent for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Naftali Bendavid, National Correspondent, Wall Street Journal

Main Topic President Obama Speaks in Cairo 43 MIN, 53 SEC

President Obama delivered his much-awaited speech at Cairo University today, paying tribute to the Egyptian people and the contribution of Islam to the history of science and culture. He called for an end to the tensions between Muslims and the United States that have been caused by historical forces, including colonialism, the Cold War and the changes brought by modernity. He explained his goals in Iraq and Afghanistan, addressed Iran's nuclear aspirations and cited the Koran in a call for speaking truth after years of mistrust. Did he reach young people on the Arab street? Will his words make a difference to Israelis and Palestinians? What about Muslims in other parts of the world? We sample reactions from a variety of sources. 

Guests:
Michael Slackman, Foreign Correspondent, New York Times
Fawaz Gerges, London School of Economics and Politics
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace (@wrightr)
Saad Eddin Ibrahim, Egyptian human rights advocate
Geoffrey Aronson, Foundation for Middle East Peace

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