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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Barack Obama received the Nobel Peace Prize today for what the prize committee called "his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples."  Also today, corporate America is divided over climate change.  Will regulations that raise costs for some create profits for others?

Banner image: President Barack Obama watches as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (L) and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas (R) shake hands at a trilateral meeting at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York, NY, September 22, 2009. Official White House photo: Pete Souza

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Karen Radziner
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Gary Scott

Making News In Shocker, Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize 23 MIN, 41 SEC

The Nobel Committee today awarded the 2009 prize for Peace to US President Barack Obama for "his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples." After only nine months on the job, the President said he was "surprised and humbled," and acknowledged the honor as "an affirmation of American leadership on behalf of aspirations held by people in all nations." Accepting the prize as "a call to action," Obama spoke of the many "transformative figures who have been honored by this prize, men and women who have inspired [him] and inspired the entire world by their courageous pursuit of peace." We get reaction from Washington and around the world.

Guests:
Michael Scherer, Time Magazine (@michaelscherer)
Ron Brownstein, National Journal (@RonBrownstein)
Peter Beinart, New America Foundation (@PeterBeinart)
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace and Woodrow Wilson Center (@wrightr)

The Second Civil War

Ron Brownstein

Main Topic Big Business and Climate Change 27 MIN, 17 SEC

Corporate America is divided on the issue of global warming. Apple and three big utilities -- Exelon, PNM Resources and PG&E -- have resigned from the US Chamber of Commerce because it opposes government efforts to reduce greenhouse gases. Nike, General Electric and Johnson & Johnson are still members, but have declared that the Chamber does not represent their views on climate change. Will regulations that raise costs for some create profits for others? Will shareholders pay any price for going green? Is there profit to be made from proposed laws designed to protect the environment? 

Guests:
Anne Kelly, Director of Governance Programs, Ceres
Steven Milloy, Adjunct Scholar, Competitive Enterprise Institute
Joel Bakan, Professor of Law, University of British Columbia
Peter Firestein, corporate consultant

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