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FROM THIS EPISODE

The State of Massachusetts has abolished capital punishment… but the Boston Marathon bomber was convicted in federal court. Nobody doubts Jahar Tsarnaev was guilty, and the "penalty phase" makes execution an option -- even though Bostonians are opposed.

Also, the Senate reaches a deal for a confirmation vote on Loretta Lynch. On today’s Talking Point, how much of your money should you give away?

Banner image: Dzhokhar "Jahar" Tsarnaev (L) is seen with his brother Tamerlan Tsarnaev (now deceased), in the crowd at the Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013. Photo courtesy FBI

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Katie Cooper
Evan George

Senate Reaches Deal for Confirmation Vote on Loretta Lynch 6 MIN, 29 SEC

Senate leaders have reached a deal on a human trafficking, a bill held up because of a dispute over abortion. The agreement will allow a confirmation vote on Loretta Lynch, the nominee for Attorney General.


Official White House photo by Pete Suarez

Bob Cusack is editor in chief of The Hill, a news service that covers the US Capitol.

Guests:
Bob Cusack, The Hill (@BobCusack)

Life or Death for the Boston Marathon Bomber? 31 MIN, 58 SEC

The evidence of guilt is not open to question. Jahar Tsarnaev's attorneys conceded he helped plant the bombs that killed three and injured 260. Now the jury that convicted him must decide the sentence. But even the families of victims disagree. Some insist only his death will provide closure. Others say his execution would inevitably be delayed by an endless round of appeals, prolonging their agony. Opening arguments began today in the penalty phase of a trial that raises basic questions about justice in America.

Guests:
Masha Gessen, Russian-American journalist and author (@mashagessen)
Andrea Lyon, Valparaiso School of Law (@valparaisolaw)
Robert Blecker, New York Law School (@RobertBlecker)
Robert Dunham, Death Penalty Information Center (@DPInfoCtr)

More:
Lyon's 'The Death Penalty; What's Keeping it Alive'
Blecker's 'The Death of Punishment; Searching for Justice among the Worst of the Worst'
Death Penalty Information Center on perspectives of Tsarnaev victims' families

The Brothers

Masha Gessen

An Argument against Arts and Culture Charities 11 MIN, 27 SEC

In 1975, Peter Singer made a global impact with his book, Animal Liberation. He's now focused on charity — and how everyone has the obligation not just to give away whatever they can afford, but to get the biggest bang for their buck. The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism Is Changing Ideas about Living Ethically argues that everybody should give away a substantial amount of income to charities. But there's a word of caution: not all philanthropy is good philanthropy.

Photo: TED Conference

 

Guests:
Peter Singer, Princeton University

More:
TheLifeYouCanSave.org

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