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FROM THIS EPISODE

The Brexit campaign says Britain's established leaders have sold out to a distant bureaucracy and allowed immigration to get out of control. With voters about to decide if it's time to leave the European Union, there's a difference between hearts and minds.

Also, Donald Trump lags far behind Hillary Clinton's money machine. Later on the program, survivors of mass shootings watch another defeat in Washington. 

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Katie Cooper
Jenny Hamel

Trump Lags Far Behind Clinton's Money Machine 6 MIN, 30 SEC

In May, Donald Trump tweeted, "Good news is that my campaign has perhaps more cash than any campaign in the history of politics." The latest Federal Election Commission filings show that's more than a slight exaggeration, as we hear from Ken Vogel, chief investigative reporter at Politico.

Guests:
Ken Vogel, Politico.com (@kenvogel)

The "Brexit" Campaign Comes Down to the Wire 34 MIN, 2 SEC

The much-anticipated vote on British Exit from the European Union is scheduled for Thursday. Prime Minister David Cameron used stark terms today to describe the consequences for the economy. "I feel so strongly that Britain should remain in Europe. Above all, it is about our economy: It will be stronger if we stay, it will be weaker if we leave." The "Leave" campaign is based on mistrust of distant bureaucrats, fear of the global economy and anxiety over immigration -- shades of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. We hear about an American-style political struggle, complete with vitriol and shameless exaggeration.

Guests:
Douglas K. Murray, Henry Jackson Society / Spectator Magazine (@DouglasKMurray)
Robert Armstrong, Financial Times (@rbrtrmstrng)
Jeremy Cliffe, Economist magazine (@JeremyCliffe)
Richard Brooks, National Union of Students (@just_richardb)

More:
Armstrong British road trip
Why the Spectator is for "leave"
Cliffe on why Britain should "stay"
National Union of Students on the EU referendum

Shooting Victim's Daughter Watches as Gun Measures Stall Again 9 MIN, 24 SEC

After Columbine, Virginia Tech, Aurora, Tucson, Sandy Hook Charleston, San Bernardino — and now Orlando -- the families of victims visit Washington to lobby for gun control. Almost a ritual, the outcome is always the same. This week, in the aftermath of Orlando, four gun control measures died in the Senate.

Erica Smegielski, an advocate with the nonprofit Everytown for Gun Safety, is an advocate who was disappointed again. She's the daughter of Dawn Hochsprung, the Principal of Sandy Hook Elementary, who was killed along five other adults and 20 first graders.

Guests:
Erica Smegielski, Everytown for Gun Safety (@EricaSmegs)

More:
Everytown for Gun Safety on the Senate vote for background checks

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