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Veto showdown over 9/11 liability bill 6 MIN, 30 SEC

President Obama is set to veto a bipartisan bill that would let families of 9/11 victims sue Saudi Arabia in American courts. Congress is poised to override that veto – the first time that's happened in the Obama presidency. Julie Hirschfeld Davis, White House correspondent for the New York Times, has more on why bill passed and the Administration's main objection to it.

Guests:
Julie Hirschfeld Davis, New York Times (@juliehdavis)

Still feeling the Bern: Hillary's troubles with millennial voters 33 MIN, 24 SEC

Hillary Clinton still leads Donald Trump in most polls, but she's having trouble exciting a key demographic group: The younger voters who flocked to Bernie Sanders. Why is that? Why doesn't the idea of the first female president generate more enthusiasm? Sanders' campaign forced Clinton to adopt what even he describes as the most progressive Democratic Party platform in history. But that's not good enough for some Sanders supporters, who now look to third party candidates. And in a close election, millennials could tip the balance. Guest host Todd Purdum examines whether there's anything Clinton can do to change that dynamic in the weeks ahead.

Guests:
Jeremy White, filmmaker, production designer and grassroots organizer (@jeremywhite82)
Daniel Dale, Toronto Star (@ddale8)
Melissa Byrne, Democratic National Committee (@mcbyrne)
James Kirchick, Foreign Policy Initiative / Daily Beast / Tablet (@jkirchick)
Paul Taylor, author and demographer (@paultaylordc)

More:
Dale on Clinton's struggles with young voters
Kirchick on voters unwilling to vote for Clinton may learn the hard way

The Next America

Paul Taylor

A short history of arguing about politics 10 MIN, 1 SEC

Is Monday's presidential debate at Hofstra University really a debate at all? Jill Lepore is a professor of history at Harvard and a staff writer for the New Yorker. She's written a fascinating piece about the ins-and-outs of modern presidential debates since 1960 and raises provocative questions about whether we're really getting as much out of them as we could.


Presidential candidates Sen. John Kennedy and Vice President Richard Nixon pose
following their debate at a Chicago television studio, September 26, 1960.
Photo: AP Wirephoto

Guests:
Jill Lepore, Harvard University / New Yorker magazine (@NewYorker)

More:
League of Women Voters
Commission on Presidential Debates

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