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FROM THIS EPISODE

Target is only the biggest American business hacked for financial information, and the US is behind the curve when it comes to preventing more cybercrime. We hear about the ongoing risks to consumers and what might need to be done. Also, Russia's support of Assad could doom peace talks, and UAW's future may hinge on the Volkswagen vote.

Banner image: Row of cash registers at a Target store in the US. Photo: Marlith

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Caitlin Shamberg
Gideon Brower

Russian Support of Assad Dooms Peace Talks? 7 MIN, 35 SEC

Syrian rebels and their Western supporters have insisted that talks in Geneva are aimed at removing President Bashar al-Assad. During the second round, Russia explicitly rejected any discussion of that possibility. Stacy Meichtry is in Geneva for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Stacy Meichtry, Wall Street Journal (@SMeichtry)

Credit Card Safety in the Age of Cybercrime 34 MIN, 58 SEC

When Target was hacked just before Christmas for credit- and debit-card data, as well as personal information, 40 million accounts were compromised, along with non-card personal information, including phone numbers, email and street addresses for another 70 million customers. The FBI says that's just the beginning. Not all compromised businesses have been publicly identified and cyber-criminals are increasingly sophisticated. But banks, retailers -- and policy makers — are reportedly dragging their feet, with only 11% of businesses adopting available security measures. How long will it take the US to upgrade credit and debit cards?  In the meantime, how vulnerable are consumers? Is cybercrime a cost of doing business that will ultimately be passed on?

Guests:
Danielle Douglas, Washington Post (@DaniDougPost)
Tim Ryan, Kroll Advisory Solutions
Delara Derakhshani, Consumers Union (@ConsumersUnion)
David Pommerehn, Consumer Bankers Association (@CBAConnect)

UAW's Future May Hinge on VW Vote 8 MIN, 20 SEC

The United Auto Workers was one of Detroit's most influential players when that city was an industrial powerhouse. Now, the UAW's future may be at stake — in Chattanooga, Tennessee. For three days, employees in the Volkswagen AG plant have been voting on whether to establish a German-style works council. UAW president Bob King has warned that the union has no future if it can't organize in plants maintained in this country by foreign car makers. Dave Shepardson, Washington Bureau Chief for the Detroit News, is in Chattanooga to cover this week's vote.

Guests:
David Shepardson, Detroit News (@davidshepardson)

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