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Photo: Supporters of Democrat Jon Ossoff wait for the polls to come in at Ossoff's election night event. (Chris Aluka Berry/Reuters)

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns 6 MIN, 31 SEC

Uber may have changed transportation practices all over the world, but it lost almost $3 billion last year.  Yesterday, after hours of reported drama, Uber's founder, Travis Kalanick, was forced by investors to resign as the company's CEO.  Alison Griswold, who reports for the online business publication Quartz, says Kalanick will remain on the board and holds a significant share of the company.

Guests:
Alison Griswold, Quartz (@alisongriswold)

Democrats and the lessons of a losing campaign 34 MIN

If Jon Ossoff had won yesterday in the Atlanta suburbs, his campaign would have provided a blueprint for other Democrats to challenge the GOP, but he lost — after the most expensive Congressional race in history. The political novice, surprised a lot of contributors by taking a moderate tone. His opponent, veteran Republican Sharon Handel's message was tough as nails. So, was his typically centrist campaign a blueprint for failure? It's the fourth special-election defeat for Democrats with an unpopular Republican in the White House; many anti-Trump activists around the country are angry.  They're tired of waiting for the National Party to do “something right” — and they're organizing on their own at the state and local level.

Guests:
Cameron McWhirter, Wall Street Journal (@cammcwhirter)
Josh Kraushaar, Political Editor for National Journal (@HotlineJosh)
Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times (@evanhalper)
Amanda Litman, Run for Something (@amandalitman)
Doug Peacock, wilderness advocate (@doug_peacock)

More:
McWhirter on the battle for new swing voters in Georgia
Kraushaar on House Democrats borrowing from the Trump playbook
Halper on the new generation of Democrats
LA Times op-ed on how Democrats they could have had two seats for the price of one

SCOTUS takes up gerrymandering 9 MIN, 13 SEC

The US Supreme Court has agreed to hear a challenge to legislative gerrymandering in Wisconsin. The argument is that district boundaries have been drawn by Republicans to give them more seats than they deserve. Eric McGhee, research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, traces the history of gerrymandering and a case that could change common practice going back almost to the beginning of political parties.

Guests:
Eric McGhee, Public Policy Institute of California (@PPICNotes)

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