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FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo: US Air Force airmen install a fence along the US-Mexico border in Arizona, on October 3, 2006. (Dan Heaton, US Air Force)

Producers:
Sasa Woodruff
Paul von Zielbauer
Jenny Hamel

Drug-maker Mylan and its $300 "generic" EpiPen 6 MIN, 32 SEC

Mylan might or might not have good news for people who need EpiPens. They provide quick injections to protect against potentially deadly anaphylactic shock from bee stings, peanut allergies and other sources. The drug company is still increasing the price of two EpiPens to $600 — while it also produces a so-called "generic" for $300. Andrew Pollack covers the business and science of biotechnology for the New York Times.

Guests:
Andrew Pollack, New York Times

When is a policy not a policy? 32 MIN, 34 SEC

Donald Trump's waffling on immigration — which seemed at the root of his presidential campaign — has even his own campaign staff sounding confused. After months of pledging to round up and deport some 10 million people, last week he proposed what sounded like "amnesty" to some long-time supporters. Or did he?  He still wants "the wall," and he might or might not make an immigration speech Wednesday — in the interests of "clarification." If he does, how much will it matter to his base or to the rapidly diminishing number of undecided voters?

Guests:
David Graham, Atlantic magazine (@GrahamDavidA)
Mark Krikorian, Center for Immigration Studies (@MarkSKrikorian)
Adrian Pantoja, Latino Decisions / Pitzer College (@LatinoDecisions)
Mike Madrid, GrassrootsLab (@madrid_mike)

More:
Graham questions Trump's softening his views on immigration
Center for Immigration Studies on immigration opinion and the rise of Trump
Quinipiac poll on voters having already made up their minds

The sanction of contract killings in the Philippines 10 MIN, 50 SEC

In the Philippines, a new President’s war on drugs has turned a young mother into a killer for hire.


President Duterte presents a chart illustrating the drug trade network of
high level drug syndicates in the Philippines during a press conference, July 7, 2016
Photo: King Rodriguez/Presidential Communications Operation Office

When he ran for President early this year, Rodrigo Duterte promised Filipinos that 100,000 drug criminals would be killed during his first six months in office. He has sanctioned extra-judicial killings — and even offered bounties. The result has been a dramatic increase in homicides, including the killing of dead-beat customers by drug pushers — including police officers. Phelim Kine is Deputy Director of the Asia Division of Human Rights Watch.

Guests:
Phelim Kine, Human Rights Watch (@PhelimKine)

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