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FROM THIS EPISODE

Now that he looks like the nominee, Donald Trump has stopped saying the Republican process is "rigged." But, as Bernie Sanders keeps winning states without closing the delegate gap, that's what his supporters are calling the Democratic process.

Later on the program, 62 years later, a town in Mississippi may desegregate public schools. 

Photo: Tensions at the Nevada State Democratic Convention (Jon Ralston)

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Evan George
Paul von Zielbauer

Will Obama's New Overtime Rules Backfire on Workers? 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Four million American workers may now be entitled to something they've never had before: pay for overtime if they make less than $47,500 a year. The previous cut-off was $23,660. Labor Secretary Secretary Tom Perez endorsed the new rule, saying "middle class jobs deserve middle class pay. And that when you work extra you should get paid extra, that's what this is about, it's very simple but very bedrock."

But the new rule may well have unintended consequences, economically — and politically, as we hear from Noam Schieber, a labor reporter for the New York Times.

Guests:
Noam Scheiber, New York Times (@noamscheiber)

The Escape Artists

Noam Scheiber

Growing Discord among the Democrats 33 MIN, 46 SEC

After yesterday's win in Oregon and a virtual tie in Kentucky, Bernie Sanders drew another massive crowd last night near Los Angeles, where he energized the crowd, "And, we're going to win in California!." But even if that happens, Party rules make his nomination unlikely, and angry supporters could make for a rowdy convention. As mainstream Democrats call on Sanders to keep those people in line, there's a fall-out among two core constituencies: union labor and environmentalists. Will unity be more of a challenge for Democrats than it is for Republicans?

More:
Bump on Nevada Democrats accusing Sanders's campaign of inciting violence
Jon Ralston on how Sanders' NV supporters protested outside state Democratic HQ

The Forced Desegregation of a Mississippi School District 9 MIN, 33 SEC

In the case of Brown versus the Board of Education, the US Supreme Court issued one of its best-known rulings: racial segregation in public schools is unconstitutional. That was in 1954. "Massive resistance" ended a long time ago but segregation is creeping back. The tiny town of Cleveland, Mississippi never de-segregated at all.

Last week, a federal court gave Cleveland 21 more days. Shakti Belway is the lead lawyer in a case first filed in 1965.

Guests:
Shakti Belway, attorney

More:
Justice Department brief in Diane Cowan v. Cleveland School District

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