ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Recent incidents involving the National Football League have focused attention on domestic violence, including the disciplining of small children. Is spanking always a form of child abuse? Is a firm hand, administered with a loving heart, required to turn many kids into better people? 39 other countries have outlawed spanking even at home—but 19 American states allow paddling in schools. We’ll hear about the roles of religion and culture, the sanctity of the private home, and the Rights of Children.

Plus, Ukraine seeks military aid, and when Alibaba finally goes on sale tomorrow, investors won’t really get a piece of the action.

Banner Image Credit: HA! Designs - Artbyheather

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Evan George

Ukrainian President Asks for Military Aid at US Congress 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko told a rare joint session of Congress today the future of NATO and peace in Europe depend on US help for Ukrainian soldiers responding to Russia aggression. Andrew S. Weiss is Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment, where he oversees research for Russia and Eurasia.

Guests:
Andrew S. Weiss, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (@andrewsweiss)

Adrian Peterson Case Renews the Debate Over Corporal Punishment 36 MIN, 29 SEC

Running back Adrian Peterson has been suspended by the Minnesota Vikings after being indicted in Texas for reckless or negligent injury to a child. Peterson’s four-year old son reportedly suffered welts on his legs, buttocks and scrotum after Peterson whipped him with a switch like the one Peterson’s father often used on him. Voices have been raised on both sides—and one of Peterson’s best-known supporters is the legendary basketball star and sports commentator, Charles Barkley.

Guests:
Goldie Taylor, MSNBC (@goldietaylor)
Leshaun Williams, freelance writer
George Holden, Southern Methodist University (@DrNoSpank)
Alan Kazdin, Yale University

Alibaba Goes Public 7 MIN, 3 SEC

Tomorrow’s opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange will be rung by Chinese multi-billionaire Jack Ma, the owner of Alibaba. He’s expected to set off the biggest Initial Public Offering in American history. But, whatever the stock price, investors won’t actually be getting a piece of the company.

Chinese law says foreign investors cannot actually own any part of a Chinese company. That, of course, is what Alibaba is. So, tomorrow’s investors will be getting something different. Matt Schiavenza is with the International Business Times in New York City.

Guests:
Matt Schiavenza, The Atlantic (@MattSchiavenza)

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED