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Rising rents and flat-lined incomes are driving people from their homes at a record rate. But this “eviction epidemic” goes largely unnoticed. We’ll talk with the author of a new book about the Eviction Industrial Complex -- and what being kicked out by a landlord does to a family.

Also today: private equity firms have taken over public safety services like fire-fighting, police and ambulances in a big way -- a New York Times investigation says it’s hurting our health, safety and bank accounts.

 Photo credit: Samuel Mann

Producers:
Evan George
Katie Cooper
Sasa Woodruff

House Republicans Release Final Benghazi Report 5 MIN, 56 SEC

House Republicans today released a final report on the 2012 attack in Benghazi that killed 4 Americans. It has new details on the Obama administration’s failings but lacked any smoking gun evidence against then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. It comes a day after Democrats released their own report.

Guests:
Mark Thompson, Time magazine (@MarkThompson_DC)

More:
Read Thompson's article "Benghazi Report Unknowns Will Keep Political Fight Alive"

The Eviction Industrial Complex 32 MIN, 54 SEC

Eviction -- it used to be a rare occurrence, a last resort for the worst tenants. Now it’s more common than many people may realize. Harvard social science professor Matthew Desmond set out to capture the reality of what he calls “The Eviction Economy” by embedding for several months with low-income tenants in the city of Milwaukee -- and also spending time with their landlords. The result is his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City. It’s a meticulous ethnography -- but his message is also simple: that addressing poverty in America should be refocused to the simple challenge of keeping a roof over people’s heads.

Guests:
Matthew Desmond, Harvard sociologist (@just_shelter)
Nela Richardson, Redfin (@NelaRichardson)
Chancela Al-Mansour, Housing Rights Center Los Angeles

Evicted

Matthew Desmond

What happens when Public Safety goes Private 9 MIN, 38 SEC

Private Equity firms now control a significant part of public safety services like firefighting, police and ambulances, and their way of doing business is very different from both government and other for-profit businesses...different in ways that a New York Times investigation says is affecting the quality of their care to people often in very vulnerable situations, and costing them a bundle.

Guests:
Danielle Ivory, New York Times (@danielle_ivory)

More:
Read Ivory's New York Times investigation "When You Dial 911 and Wall Street Answers"

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