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Photo: A demonstrator holds signs during a rally in response to the Charlottesville, Virginia car attack on counter-protesters after the "Unite the Right" rally organised by white nationalists, in Oakland, California, August 12, 2017. (Stephen Lam/Reuters)

Trump lashes out in Phoenix 6 MIN, 31 SEC

President Trump addressed a rally of screaming supporters last night in Phoenix — largely addressing his anger at news reports about his reaction to violence by what he called "both sides" in Charlottesville. CNN and other cable news networks broadcast every minute, even though the President said they didn't.

Josh Dawsey, White House reporter for Politico, says no matter the theme of the rally, Trump seems to turn it into a venting session about everything that bothers him.

Guests:
Josh Dawsey, Politico (@jdawsey1)

More:
Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper on Trump's Phoenix rally

The ACLU when free speech turns violent 33 MIN, 31 SEC

"I may hate what you say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it."  Some version of that old saying could be the motto of the American Civil Liberties Union. Most recently, it sued to protect the rights of white racists to rally in Charlottesville -- but since the protest turned deadly, there's been a backlash. Even some ACLU members have resigned, and the organization's on the defensive about the limits of free speech. Are America's constitutional protections too broad?  Do they conflict with the right to bear arms?  We hear about rules in Germany where free speech led to tyranny.

Guests:
David D. Cole, American Civil Liberties Union / Georgetown University (@DavidColeACLU)
Eric Segall, Georgia State University (@espinsegall)
Samuel Walker, University of Nebraska Omaha (@UNOmaha)
Laurie Marhoefer, University of Washington (@L_Marhoefer)

More:
ACLU on equality, justice and the First Amendment
Marhoefer on lessons from Germany about protesting neo-Nazis

An inside look at Sputnik's propaganda operation 9 MIN, 44 SEC

The BBC and AFP are state-owned information services that produce real news — highly respected by the international news media. When Andrew Feinberg signed on to the Russian-owned outlet Sputnik, he was assured it was just the same. After all, it has a seat at the White House briefings. But in an article for Politico, Sputnik's former White House correspondent says it was not what it seemed.

Guests:
Andrew Feinberg, journalist (@agfhome)

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