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FROM THIS EPISODE

With just six weeks left until the Iowa caucuses, there were still nine Republican presidential candidates in last night's debate in Las Vegas. According to public opinion polls, it was Donald Trump and eight others. We hear what happened and what might be next.

Later on the program, residents of public housing often get counseling to help them improve their lives. Now Worcester, Massachusetts says, if you don't comply you'll be evicted. Is that local government going too far? 

Producers:
Sarah Sweeney
Katie Cooper
Gideon Brower

Fed Announces First Interest Rate Hike in Almost 10 Years 6 MIN, 17 SEC

For the first time in nearly a decade, the Federal Reserve raised the so-called benchmark interest rate today. It's gone up one quarter of one percent. Michelle Jamrisko reports on the economy for Bloomberg News.

Guests:
Michelle Jamrisko, Bloomberg News (@mljamrisko)

Truth, Promises and Public Opinion 34 MIN, 5 SEC

Nine candidates made it to prime time last night in Las Vegas, chosen again by their standing in public opinion polls. Donald Trump made the biggest news, saying he loves the GOP after all and promising not to stage a third-party rebellion. The theme was national security and all nine played variations on the anger of the conservative base and the fear caused by attacks on Paris and San Bernardino. Fact checkers are working overtime and debate continues over whether the polls reflect public opinion — or shape it.

Guests:
Mark Leibovich, New York Times (@MarkLeibovich)
Eli Lake, Bloomberg View (@EliLake)
Lauren Carroll, PolitiFact (@LaurenFCarroll)
Jill Lepore, Harvard University / New Yorker magazine (@NewYorker)
Harry Enten, FiveThirtyEight (@ForecasterEnten)

More:
Leibovich on the narrative becoming the story
PolitiFact on the GOP Las Vegas debate
Lepore on what the turn from polls to data science means for democracy
Enten on Trump cherry-picking favorable polls

Massachusetts Public Housing Residents Must Work or Risk Eviction 8 MIN, 43 SEC

In Worcester, Massachusetts a city program called A Better Life is supposed to transform the lives of people in public housing. But Ray Mariano, head of the Worcester Housing Authority, is not asking people to improve themselves, he's telling them to get a job, go to school or get out. Alana Semuels is a writer for the Atlantic magazine.


Ray Mariano, head of the Worcester Housing Authority
Photo by Alana Semuels / The Atlantic

Guests:
Alana Semuels, Atlantic magazine

More:
Massachusetts Education and Career Opportunities (MassEdCO)

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