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FROM THIS EPISODE

America's airways have a remarkable record of safety, but recent near misses in the air over New York airports have sparked calls for overhaul of the FAA.  Air-traffic controllers say they're understaffed and overworked. Why are they using 60-year old technology to keep track of planes in the air? What's in store for passengers in a record summer for travel? Also, Lewis "Scooter" Libby will be going to jail and, on Reporter's Notebook, will the West Bank and Gaza be run by different Palestinian factions? 


Photo: Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Producers:
Vanessa Romo
Christian Bordal
Karen Radziner

Making News Judge Won't Delay Libby's Prison Sentence 6 MIN, 6 SEC

In Washington Federal District Court today, Judge Reggie Walton has ruled that Lewis "Scooter" Libby, former chief-of-staff for Vice President Dick Cheney, should go to jail, even though Libby is appealing his conviction for perjury and obstruction of justice.  Rick Schmitt reports for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Richard Schmitt, Staff Reporter, Los Angeles Times

Reporter's Notebook Hamas Takes Over Gaza as Hamas-Fatah Coalition Crumbles 8 MIN, 16 SEC

There's been more bloody fighting today in the Gaza strip.  Hamas fighters have overrun two of the Fatah faction's most important command centers in the Gaza Strip. There are reports that Fatah gunmen were dragged into the street and shot to death execution style. The European Union has suspended humanitarian aid and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has dismissed the unity government.  Joshua Mitnick has covered the fighting for the Christian Science Monitor.

Guests:
Joshua Mitnick, Correspondent, Christian Science Monitor

Main Topic Mid-Air Near-Collisions Are a New Worry for FAA, Travelers 34 MIN, 18 SEC

Today's New York Post reports the Department of Transportation has launched an investigation into a spike of near-collisions in the air over JFK, Newark and La Guardia airports. Those incidents have generated alarm as airlines predict a record summer for travel.  Planes are supposed to be three miles from each other, but aircraft got as close as 500 feet on five occasions just in the month of May.  Air-traffic controllers say they are understaffed and overworked all over the country.  In the age of global positioning satellites, they have World War II-era radar to keep track of planes in the air. How much change is needed? How soon?  Would moving too fast endanger a system that still boasts a remarkable record for safety?

Guests:
Darryl Jenkins, Aviation consultant
Hamid Ghaffari, Regional VP of the Natonal Air Traffic Controllers Association
Basil Barimo, VP of Operations and Safety for the Air Transport Association
Andrew Thomas, Aviation security analyst

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