ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

As the troop "surge" in Baghdad gets mixed reviews, Iraq's political leaders are still immobilized by sectarian differences. Will the President's new leadership team make a difference? Also, renewed violence in Gaza and, on Reporter's Notebook, a shattering anti-climax for one of television’s most successful series.  We hear the last of The Sopranos.


Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Dan Konecky

Reporter's Notebook Did My Cable Go Out during 'The Sopranos' Finale? 7 MIN, 9 SEC

Last night, millions of Americans thought there was trouble with their TV reception. But then the credits rolled on an anti-climax that has now taken its place in entertainment history. After 86 episodes including plenty of murderous violence, millions of viewers expected a dramatic ending to The Sopranos. As the Soprano family sat down for dinner at a family restaurant, nothing happened. Professor Robert Thompson founding director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television.

Guests:
Robert Thompson, Syracuse University

Making News New Clashes in Gaza 5 MIN, 56 SEC

In Gaza, eight Palestinians were killed today, and twenty-five more were wounded in factional fighting.  The dead included two people thrown off rooftops. Avi Issacharoff, who reports for the Israeli newspaper Ha’aretz, says the violence constitutes a sort of civil war between Fatah and Hamas.



Guests:
Avi Issacharoff, Ha'aretz (@issacharoff)

Main Topic In Iraq, New Policies or More of the Same? 35 MIN, 38 SEC

President Bush is shaking up his leadership team, creating new uncertainty in Washington and on the battlegrounds of Iraq. He's nominating Navy Admiral Michael Mullen to replace Peter Pace as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Senate's about to confirm Army General Douglas Lute to replace Steven Hadley in overseeing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Baghdad "surge" is getting mixed reviews, and Iraq's political leaders are still immobilized by sectarian differences. Yet, despite increased calls to bring the troops home, the Pentagon and the White House are talking about a commitment that could last for decades. We hear about top-level changes and what they could mean on the ground. Is the US arming both sides of a developing civil war?

Guests:
Peter Spiegel, Financial Times (@SpiegelPeter)
Steven Simon, International Institute for Strategic Studies
Ali Allawi, former Iraqi Minister of Trade, Defense and Finance
Peter Galbraith, former Deputy Special Representative in Afghanistan for the UN Secretary General

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER