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FROM THIS EPISODE

While Israel and Hezbollah make real war on each other, they're also fighting a virtual war of ideas and images. We hear about propaganda on both sides and ask how the mainstream media figure out what's true and what's false.  Plus, Lebanon's offer to participate in the peace-keeping force and the latest from the Federal Reserve.

Main Topic In Mid-East Fighting, What's News? What's Propaganda? 40 MIN

The war between Israel and Hezbollah is being fought not just on the ground but also in the media. Both sides are adept at propaganda--to persuade the other side it's losing and to influence the ideas and images reported in the rest of the world. Israel bombards southern Lebanon with phone calls, e-mails and leaflets that one reporter has called "propaganda bombs" that flutter to the streets "like confetti." Hezbollah provides "escorts" for western reporters.  How do mainstream newspapers, radio and television stations sort it all out?  We speak with journalists and Middle East experts about propaganda on both sides and ask how the mainstream media figure out what's true and what's false.

Guests:
Ilene Prusher, Jerusalem Bureau Chief, Christian Science Monitor
Hanady Salman, Reporter for the Lebanese newspaper, As Safir
Walid Phares, Director of the Future of Terrorism Project, Foundation for the Defense of Democracies'
Ali Abunimah, Electronic Intifada (@aliabunimah)
Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Daily News

Reporter's Notebook No New Hikes from Federal Reserve Meeting 8 MIN

In 17 consecutive meetings since June of 2004, the Federal Reserve increased interest rates from a 46-year low of one percent to 5.25 percent as of yesterday.  That was the longest unbroken stretch of rate hikes in recent history.  Michael Hudson, staff reporter for the Wall Street Journal, has details of what the Fed did today.

Guests:
Michael W. Hudson, Staff Writer, Center for Public Integrity

Making News Lebanon Agrees to Send Troops to South 6 MIN

It's been another day of Israeli bombs, Hezbollah rockets and heavy ground fighting in Lebanon.  In the latest initiative aimed at a cease-fire, the Lebanese government has promised 15,000 soldiers as a peacekeeping force in the southern part of the country.  From Beirut, Mohamad Bazzi, Middle East Bureau Chief for Newsday, reports on the Lebanese government's offer to participate in the peace-keeping force and the response of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert.

Guests:
Mohamad Bazzi, New York University (@BazziNYU)

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