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FROM THIS EPISODE

After eight years of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Iran's clerical leaders have tried minimize controversy in tomorrow's presidential election.  But political opposition may rise to the surface, with possible consequences for nuclear development and relations with the US and the rest of the world. Also, the Supreme Court rules that isolated genes can't be patented, and cybersecurity becomes an issue in medicine.

Banner image: A supporter carries a campaign poster for Iranian presidential candidate Hassan Rouhani on the streets of Tehran June 12, 2013. Photo: Mehdi Ghassemi/Reuters/ISNA

Producers:
Anna Scott
Christian Bordal
Caitlin Shamberg

Main Topic Iran's Presidential Election: Interesting after All 34 MIN, 17 SEC

Four years ago, widespread protests over President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's re-election appeared to  threaten Iran's clerical leadership. Some dissidents are still in jail. Now that Ahmadinejad is termed out, candidates to succeed him in tomorrow's election have been picked to minimize controversy. Even two former presidents who wanted to run have been declared "ineligible." But the campaign has seen a flicker of life in the past two days. Could a relative moderate win, or at least force a run-off election?  What could that mean for the economy, relations with the US and Iran's nuclear program?

Guests:
Marcus George, Reuters
Ali Reza Eshraghi, Institute for War and Peace Reporting
Kasra Naji, BBC Persian TV (@BBCKasraNaji)
Trita Parsi, National Iranian American Council (@tparsi)
Laicie Heeley, Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation (@laicie)

Ahmadinejad

Kasra Naji

Making News Supreme Court Rules that Isolated Genes Can't Be Patented 7 MIN, 45 SEC

A unanimous opinion today by the US Supreme Court says human genes cannot be patented after all, because they are natural phenomena. But that's not all they decided. Tom Taylor is assistant managing editor at US Law Week.

Guests:
Tom Taylor, US Law Week (@Tom_PTaylor)

Reporter's Notebook FDA Aims to Strengthen Security on Medical Devices 8 MIN, 58 SEC

As American medicine becomes more computerized, cybersecurity is an increasing concern. Pacemakers, fetal monitors, and computers used to view XRays and CT scans are subject to malicious hacking. Incidents that used to occur once or twice a year are now happening monthly or even weekly. So today, the FDA asked medical device makers to fortify their products against hackers and malware. Christopher Weaver covers medical technology for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Christopher Weaver, Wall Street Journal (@cdweaver)

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