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FROM THIS EPISODE

America's continuing drive for material well-being has made it the world’s colossus, but it may also contain the seeds of destruction.  Will unlimited economic growth be the undoing—not just of America, but the rest of the world? Also, secret DOJ memos on interrogation, and America's latest counterinsurgency weapon in Iraq and Afghanistan--anthropology.

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Christian Bordal
Dan Konecky

Main Topic Do We Have Too Much? 35 MIN

America's continuing drive for material well-being has made it the world's colossus, but it may also contain the seeds of destruction. That sounds like fire-and-brimstone preaching, but it's also a warning from pragmatic experts on energy independence and global warming. Will unlimited economic growth be the undoing—not just of America, but the rest of the world? If it wanted to, could the US just slow down and replace the drive for disposable luxury with a yen for quality and longevity based on renewable resources?

Guests:
David Freeman, Deputy Mayor, City of Los Angeles
Tom Donlan, Barron's (@barronsonline)
Steve Glenn, CEO, LivingHomes
Robert H. Frank, Cornell University

Reporter's Notebook Anthropologists Help Military in Afghanistan, Iraq 7 MIN, 43 SEC

The Pentagon has deployed some very different kinds of soldiers in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Military officers say that anthropologists and other social scientists are making their jobs easier. Today's New York Times reports on what it calls "a crucial new weapon in counterinsurgency operations" in Afghanistan: "a soft spoken civilian anthropologist named Tracy.  Pulitzer Prize-winner David Rohde, who wrote the story, explains how it all works as well as the controversy in academic circles over what some denounce as "mercenary anthropology."

Guests:
David Rohde, Reuters (@RohdeD)

Making News Bush Responds to DOJ Terror Memos 6 MIN, 7 SEC

Yesterday's New York Times revealed the existence of two previously secret Justice Department memos on techniques for interrogating suspected terrorists.  Contrary to public statements calling torture "abhorrent," they explicitly authorized head-slapping, simulated drowning and exposure to extreme cold. After Democrats demanded to see them, President Bush repeated his insistence that "the US does not torture." Scott Shane is one of the authors of yesterday's story.


Guests:
Scott Shane, New York Times (@ScottShaneNYT)

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