ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Photo: A man walks by Mindaugas Bonanu's mural on the wall of a restaurant in Lithuania that shows Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin kissing each other. 

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Katie Cooper
Sasa Woodruff

Are we seeing the beginning of the end of the Syrian war? 6 MIN, 30 SEC

The ceasefire in Syria is holding — at least for the moment. But the UN is still having problems delivering humanitarian aid to Aleppo and other parts of a country devastated by five years of civil war. Philip Issa, who is based in Beirut, Lebanon for the Associated Press, has an update.

Guests:
Philip Issa, Associated Press (@philiptissa)

The America presidential nominee and the Russian strongman 35 MIN, 43 SEC

Donald Trump admires Vladimir Putin for what he calls "strong leadership" — especially compared to Barack Obama. The President says "strong leadership" means cronyism, corruption and censorship, while healthcare, education and the economy are in decline. But polls show many Republicans, once warned by Ronald Reagan about an "evil empire," now look more kindly on Russia under Putin’s iron-fisted control. We talk with a reporter who interviewed Putin for two hours. What did he say about Donald Trump? What about trying to manipulate American voters? As Trump sings praises for Russia's leader, how strong is the appeal of Putin's authoritarian style to American voters? 

Guests:
John Micklethwait, Bloomberg News (@business)
Masha Gessen, Russian-American journalist and author (@mashagessen)
Jonathan Weiler, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (@jonweiler)
Kurt Eichenwald, Newsweek (@kurteichenwald)

More:
Micklethwait's Putin interview
Gessen on the Trump-Putin fallacy
Eichenwald on how the Trump organization's foreign business ties could upend US national security

Authoritarianism and Polarization in American Politics

Jonathan Weiler and Marc J. Hetherington

Championship exits are huge blow to North Carolina sports 7 MIN, 43 SEC

The controversial "bathroom law" is facing a tough challenge from professional and college sports leagues pulling out of North Carolina.

The Public Facilities Privacy & Security Act, HB 2, is North Carolina's new law, also known as "the bathroom bill." It's aimed at anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. HB 2 provides that individuals may not use bathrooms that don't correspond to the sexual designations on their birth certificates. Now, in a state where sports may be more important than politics, it's facing a challenge from both the NCAA and Atlantic Coast Conference.  David Gardner, College Sports Editor for Sports Illustrated, has the story.

Guests:
David Gardner, Sports Illustrated (@byDavidGardner)

More:
GOP spokeswoman Kami Mueller on the NCAA move

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED