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FROM THIS EPISODE

Rupert Murdoch is accused of "willful blindness" to wrongdoing and of being "unfit" to run his international media empire. We look at his problems and his influence on journalism. Also, Chen Guangcheng overshadows Clinton's China visit, and the college student DEA agents forgot.

Banner image: Rupert Murdoch (L) looks to his wife, Wendi Deng Murdoch, as they are driven from the Royal Courts of Justice after he gave evidence to the Leveson Inquiry on April 26, 2012 in London, England. Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Andrea Brody
Gideon Brower

Main Topic Rupert Murdoch: Finance, Politics and Journalism 37 MIN, 43 SEC

Rupert Murdoch is best known in the US for Fox News and the Wall Street Journal, but his media empire spans the world of communications. Now, a committee of Britain’s parliament has accused him of not being "a fit person" to run an international company. Will hacking telephones, bribing public officials and covering up wrong-doing mean the end of an empire? We look at Murdoch’s legal, financial and political problems, as well as his impact on the news business in the English speaking world.

Guests:
Alan Cowell, New York Times (@cowellcnd)
Richard Ackland, Australian journalist and editor (@JustinianNews)
William Shawcross, British journalist and author
Eric Boehlert, Media Matters (@EricBoehlert)

Murdoch

William Shawcross

Making News Chen Guangcheng Overshadows Clinton's China Visit 6 MIN, 22 SEC

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Beijing for talks on Iran, North Korea and economic relations. But those issues have been overshadowed by the escape of the blind dissident Chen Guangcheng, his release from the US Embassy and his changing story. Elizabeth Economy is Senior Fellow and Director of Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Guests:
Elizabeth Economy, Council on Foreign Relations (@LizEconomy)

The River Runs Black

Elizabeth C. Economy

Reporter's Notebook Student Abandoned in DEA Holding Cell 5 MIN, 38 SEC
The Federal Drug Enforcement Agency has acknowledged that agents arrested a 23-year-old college senior, told him he'd be released and then left him alone in a holding cell for five days with no food or water. The DEA calls it an accident. Daniel Chong was picked up in a drug raid near the University of California, San Diego and taken to the Kearny Mesa facility. He was questioned and told he would be let go. Then, his five-day nightmare began. Jeff McDonald reports for U-T San Diego (formerly the "San Diego Union-Tribune").

Guests:
Jeff McDonald, U-T San Diego (@sdutMcDonald)

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