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FROM THIS EPISODE

When a fence jumper gets to the East Room and gunfire breaks windows, the White House is clearly not be the safest place in the world. When a felon armed with a pistol rides an elevator with the world’s most powerful man, it doesn’t take a Secret Service veteran to see a disaster waiting to happen. Experts blame a management culture so arrogant that cover-ups of serious threats and dangerous deficiencies are part of the job. Both Republicans and Democrats agree there’s a world-class problem. What needs to be done?

Also, unemployment falls below 6%. Plus, airstrikes in the Middle East: a boon for defense contractors.

Banner Image Credit: ehpien

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Katie Cooper
Jenny Hamel

Unemployment Falls Below 6 Percent, First Time in 6 Years 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Unemployment has dropped below 6% for the first time in six years, providing some substance to a claim President Obama made yesterday during a campaign-type speech in Illinois. In his speech, Obama asserted, "So it is indisputable that our economy is stronger today than it was when I took office."

Kevin Hall is Chief Economics Correspondent for the McClatchy Newspapers.

Guests:
Kevin Hall, McClatchy Newspapers (@KevinGHall)

Is the Secret Service Keeping the President Safe? 36 MIN, 42 SEC

The Secret Service is charged with making the White House the safest place in the world. When every agent swears to take a bullet for the President of the United States, the purpose is to create an aura of invincibility. Now that aura is fading.

Guests:
Jonathan Capehart, Washington Post (@CapehartJ)
Dan Emmett, former Secret Service agent
Ronald Kessler, author, 'The First Family Detail' (@RonaldKessler)
Ian Swanson, The Hill (@iswanTheHill)

US Airstrikes a Boon for Defense Contractors 6 MIN, 49 SEC

America’s pull-backs from Iraq and Afghanistan have meant troubled times for defense contractors. But, daily airstrikes in Iraq and Syria have been good for business. The question is, how long will that last?

With defense spending shrinking, major defense contractors have laid off workers, merged with one another and slowed production lines. But daily attacks in Iraq and Syria require bombers, fighters and drones to pour out tons of munitions. Wall Street is already paying attention. That’s according to Pentagon Correspondent William Hennigan in today’s Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
William Hennigan, Los Angeles Times / Chicago Tribune (@wjhenn)

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