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FROM THIS EPISODE

Coverage of the Affordable Care Act has been all about Healthcare.gov and President Obama's false reassurances.  But healthcare reform is bigger than politics.  We look at where it appears to be working as well as where it's not. Also, talks begin in Geneva regarding an Iran nuclear deal, and the US Senate's 20 women members have adopted a new approach to major legislation: consensus as opposed to partisanship.

Banner image: jfcherry

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Jenny Hamel
Caitlin Shamberg

Making News Talks Commence in Geneva Regarding Iran Nuclear Deal 7 MIN, 50 SEC

As the US and six other nations prepared to sit down with Iran today in Geneva, Iran's Supreme Leader assured hard-liners there would be no compromise on "rights" and "principles," and Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif released a kind of campaign video. Robin Wright is a senior fellow at the US Institute of Peace.

 

 

Guests:
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace (@wrightr)

THE IRAN PRIMER

Robin Wright

Main Topic Is Obamacare Really on 'Life Support?' 33 MIN, 54 SEC

The troubled roll-out of healthcare.gov and televised hearings on Capitol Hill have taken the wind out of Obamacare. The President's false reassurances have hardly enhanced its image. But the Affordable Care Act is a massive undertaking. In some states with their own exchanges, people who've never had health insurance are able to sign up. In other places, there's evidence of intentional sabotage. We look at the goals of health insurance reform and early successes as well as failures.

Guests:
Michael Hiltzik, Los Angeles Times (@latimeshiltzik)
Diane Rowland, Kaiser Family Foundation (@KaiserFamFound)
Michael Marchand, Washington Health Benefit Exchange (@WAplanfinder)
DeAnn Friedholm, Consumers Union (@ConsumersUnion)

Today's Talking Point Sexual Assault Bill Is a Win for Women in the Senate 7 MIN, 50 SEC

Except for immigration reform, all the major bills passed by the US Senate this session have been authored by women. Faced with two competing measures on sexual assault in the military, all 20 female US Senators agreed to bury their differences and call it a major win either way. And that's the result of the choice of consensus over partisanship among four Republicans and 16 Democrats.  So reports Jay Newton-Small, congressional correspondent for Time magazine.

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