ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The Beijing Olympics and Russia's actions in Georgia pose new challenges to the US and the western alliance.  Is it time for aggressiveness or accommodation? Is there a risk of confrontations that can't be won?  Also, NATO troops come under fire from the Taliban, and with less than a week before the presidential nominating conventions begin, what's latest on public opinion.


Banner image: China's Zou Kai, winner of the Horizontal gold medal at the Beijing Olympic Games. Photo: Xinhua

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Andrea Brody
Frances Anderton

Making News NATO Troops under Fire from the Taliban 6 MIN, 1 SEC

Yesterday, ten French paratroopers were ambushed and killed in Afghanistan. Today, as many as ten people died from a missile strike on a suspected militant hideout in Pakistan. Meantime, French President Nicolas Sarkozy has arrived in Kabul, where Anand Gopal is reporting for the Christian Science Monitor.

Guests:
Anand Gopal, New America Foundation (@anand_gopal_)

Reporter's Notebook McCain and Obama Draw Even in Polls 9 MIN, 28 SEC

With the nominating conventions at hand, John McCain and Barack Obama are campaigning hard, despite competition from the Beijing Olympics. What's the impact of Russia's invasion of Georgia? Will the Vice Presidential selections make a difference? A new poll by John Zogby for the Reuters news service shows McCain up by five points. Two others show a virtual dead heat. They are the Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll and a survey by the Pew Research Center, where Andrew Kohut is President.

Guests:
Andrew Kohut, Pew Research Center (@pewresearch)

Main Topic The Rise of Russia and China: A New Cold War? 33 MIN, 9 SEC

With the fall of Communism, some Americans called it inevitable that Russia—and even China—would become more like the West. But the Beijing Olympics and Russia's actions in Georgia are the latest proof that economic strength and military power don't require liberal democracy. How should the United States act now in a world that's increasingly competitive economically, politically and militarily? Is it time for increased aggressiveness or accommodation?  How important are ideological differences? What are the risks of confrontations the US and Europe can't win? 

Guests:
Robert Kagan, Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Stephen F. Cohen, New York University
Charles Grant, Director, Centre for European Reform

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK