ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Ten years after the attacks in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, is there a "9/11 Generation?" Was it a defining experience for young Americans and for youth in the Arab Middle East? Also, poor jobs numbers increase political pressure on the President and Congress. On Reporter's Notebook, so many objects in low-Earth orbit are crashing into each other, they’re multiplying, creating a "tipping point" for space travel and unmanned satellites. What can be done?

Banner image: Kevin Van Orden, whose brother is in the US Army, celebrates outside the World Trade Center site after the death of accused 9/11 mastermind Osama bin Laden was announced May 2, 2011 in New York City. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images

Producers:
Sonya Geis
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper

Making News Jobs Numbers Increase Political Pressure on President, Congress 7 MIN, 47 SEC

In July, the economy produced 85,000 jobs, and 60,000 were predicted for August. Now the results are in and they're more than disappointing: no new jobs at all for the first time in almost a year. Major Garrett is Congressional correspondent for National Journal.

Guests:
Major Garrett, National Journal (@MajoratNJ)

Main Topic September 11 and Young People 36 MIN, 11 SEC

In the days after 9/11, Americans felt a sense of national unity unseen since World War II. Within six months, it was gone, except among the Middle Class young. Members of what's called the "9/11 Generation" are still more politically aware, socially conscious and plugged in than their parents. That's also true in countries now experiencing the so-called "Arab Spring," for very different reasons. We look at causes and consequences today.

Guests:
Tom Sander, Harvard University's Saguaro Seminar
Nick Troiano, senior at Georgetown University
Chris Wolfe, writer and performer
Reza Aslan, University of California, Riverside (@rezaaslan‎)

Reporter's Notebook Quantity of Space Junk Reaches 'Tipping Point' 7 MIN, 2 SEC

In 2009, two satellites — one left over from the Soviet era and another important to current communications — crashed into each other. The result was 1700 pieces of space debris big enough to track from the Earth, so much that NASA is studying cosmic nets, magnets and giant umbrellas to protect satellites and allow for new travel in space. What will it take to retain control of that environment? Ian O'Neill is space science producer for Discovery News.

Guests:
Ian O'Neill, Discovery News (@astroengine)

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK