ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Are Wikipedia, Google and an infinite number of web blogs, liberating our culture or killing it by abolishing traditional standards and blurring the difference between what's really true and what's false. We consider the backlash against Internet 2.0. Also, the upcoming Iowa caucus, and if you've been wondering about the good things to eat, the author of Omnivore’s Dilemma follows it up with a book In Defense of Food.

  • Note: This archived edition of TtP, will not air live on KCRW as it will be pre-empted by special holiday programming.

Producers:
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook Food Versus Edible Food-like Substances 8 MIN, 57 SEC

After reading Michel Pollan's vastly successful book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, the Wall Street Journal's reviewer said, "Eating is no longer a simple pleasure." Beyond that, and despite nutritional science, the industrialized products we call "food" aren't food any more, and they've given America "a national eating disorder."  Today, Pollan's latest book is being released. It's called In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto.

Guests:
Michael Pollan, New York Times (@michaelpollan)

In Defense of Food

Michael Pollan

Making News Understanding the Caucus Process 6 MIN, 15 SEC

Two days from today, American voters will finally be heard from about their presidential preferences—not at the polls, but at caucuses in the state of Iowa. What are they? How do they work? Does the process—especially on the Democratic side—reveal how the caucus-goers really feel?  David Redlawsk is Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the University of Iowa's Hawkeye Poll.

Guests:
David Redlawsk, Director, University of Iowa Hawkeye Poll

Main Topic Is Today's Internet Killing Our Culture? 30 MIN, 20 SEC

Internet 2.0, the participatory websites that depend on content generated by users, is under attack. Once hailed for democratizing culture by providing more information from more sources without either filters or fees, critics now contend that web blogs, Google and Wikipedia are replacing expert gatekeepers with the "wisdom of crowds," often ignorant and wrong. Will traditional standards devolve into cultural anarchy where nobody knows what's true or false or will history's biggest communications explosion liberate culture from the heavy hand of self-interested elites?

Guests:
Andrew Keen, entrepreneur and author (@ajkeen)
Xeni Jardin, Technology-culture journalist
Larry Sanger, Co-Founder, Wikipedia
Clay Shirky, Adjunct Professor in NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER