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FROM THIS EPISODE

It sounds like a Hollywood movie, but surveillance technologies developed for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may be coming to a city near you. Will "wide-area surveillance" and "facial recognition" make America safer? Do they threaten the right to privacy and the presumption of innocence? Also, Russia and Ukraine reach a deal, but pro-Russia militants are ignoring it. On today's Talking Point: a planet 500 light years away that looks very familiar. 

Banner image: Imagery from Persistent Surveillance's "wide-area surveillance" technologies.

Producers:
Andrea Brody
Mike Kessler
Kareem Maddox

Pro-Russia Militants Are Ignoring Russia-Ukraine Deal 7 MIN, 49 SEC

Yesterday in Geneva, diplomats from the US, Ukraine, the European Union and Russia agreed that its time for an end to the violence in Easter Ukraine. What's happening today on the ground? We get an update from Reporter Andrew Kramer is in the city of Donetsk for the New York Times.

Guests:
Andrew Kramer, New York Times (@AndrewKramerNYT)

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Police, Planes, Videotapes and the Constitution 34 MIN, 48 SEC

Law enforcement agencies around the country are experimenting with technologies developed for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. These high-tech video recording can track whatever moves in an American city for hours at a time. One of the, called "wide-area surveillance" is like Google Earth with a rewind button: a kind of time machine, allowing police to review a crime and also track what happened before and after. It and other new technologies, including facial recognition, might even lead to stopping crimes in progress. But they're way ahead of the law. Will they increase public safety at the price of eliminating privacy in public places?

Guests:
G.W. Schulz, Center for Investigative Reporting (@GWSchulzCIR)
Richard Biehl, Dayton Police Department (@DaytonPolice)
Jennifer Lynch, Electronic Frontier Foundation (@lynch_jen)
Vivek Wadhwa, Stanford University (@wadhwa)

More:
CIR/KQED on use of cutting-edge technology in fighting crime
Electronic Frontier Foundation's Surveillance Self-Defense Project
Persistent Surveillance's wide-area aerial surveillance systems
Schulz on 'Hollywood-style' surveillance technology
Wadwah on law and ethics trying to keep pace with technology

Scientists Find a Potentially Habitable Planet 8 MIN, 32 SEC

The holy grail of astronomers is life on another planet, presumably one that's a lot like Earth. NASA's search is now focused on Kepler 186 F. It's the first of its kind to be discovered -- and there could be many more like it. Alex Knapp is a staff writer on science and technology at Forbes magazine.

 

Guests:
Alex Knapp, Forbes magazine (@TheAlexKnapp)

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