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Photo: Protesters stand on heavy machinery after halting work on the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, September 6, 2016. (Andrew Cullen/Reuters)

Producers:
Sasa Woodruff
Christine Detz
Paul von Zielbauer

Paralympics begin in Rio 6 MIN, 20 SEC

Opening ceremonies will be held tonight for the Paralympics in Rio, but it's taken a last-minute government bailout. Ticket sales have been slow, and the Russian team won't even be there. But some 4300 athletes from other countries don't care about anything more than the chance to compete. That's according to Stephen Wade, based in Rio de Janeiro for the Associated Press.

Guests:
Stephen Wade, Associated Press (@StephenWadeAP)

Native Americans versus big oil 33 MIN, 32 SEC

About 2000 Native Americans from tribes all over the country have gathered in Canon Ball, North Dakota near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. They're waiting for a court ruling on Friday, when a federal judge will decide if construction on an oil pipeline should be stopped for an environmental impact report. Did the Army Corps of Engineers ignore Indian rights when it approved an oil pipeline under the Missouri River? The tribes claim it endangers the water supply and that sacred burial sites have already been disturbed. In the past few days, there's been violence. A new generation is raising issues that go back to America's founding — in the midst of current debate on the nation's energy supply. 

NOTE: On Friday, September 9, Federal District Judge James Boasberg denied the tribes' motion for a preliminary injunction. Later that same day, Obama Administration announced that it would re-evaluate its decision on the pipeline.

Guests:
Chase Iron Eyes, Standing Rock Sioux (@ChaseIronEyes)
Phil Kerpen, American Commitment (@kerpen)
Phil McKenna, InsideClimate News (@mckennapr)
Stephanie Tsosie, Earthjustice (@Earthjustice)

More:
Kerpen on dishonest environmentalist, oil pipeline protest
Earthjustice on Standing Rock litigation

Voting security and hacking American elections 9 MIN, 51 SEC

TALKING POINT
Many American voting systems have gone from paper ballots to voting machines and now to computers, which are vulnerable to hacking. How secure is the franchise? We talk with a local voting official who knows.


Photo by April Sikorski

Recent hacking of voting systems in several states — apparently by Russians — has caused doubts about the integrity of democracy in America. Last week, we heard about the growing concerns of federal intelligence agencies. But voting is administered separately in all 50 states — which often have different systems within their own borders. Ion Sancho is Supervisor of Elections in Leon County, Florida, where he was deeply involved in the contested presidential election in the year 2000.

Guests:
Ion Sancho, Leon County Elections Division

Hacking Democracy

Simon Ardizzone

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